ExamII_Q2

ExamII_Q2 - Kant's View On Cheating & The Formula of...

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Kant's View On Cheating & The Formula of Universal Law Kant argued that moral requirements are based on a standard of rationality and established the principle of the categorical imperative. His first formulation of the categorical imperative was “act only in accordance with that maxim through which you can at the same time will that it become a universal law.” (G 4:421) One of the principles he also established is that determining whether or not one is behaving immorally is to ask whether or not one is cheating. The categorical imperative supports the second principle, which also relates to the formula of universal law. Kant believed that immoral behavior is a form of cheating; whether cheating ourselves or people around us. He held that ordinary moral thought recognizes moral duties towards ourselves as well as others around us. Thus, cheating is a form of making an exception to one's self to achieve some goal which one does not deserve. Therefore it is an immoral action towards others; like Kant, some religiously oriented
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ExamII_Q2 - Kant's View On Cheating & The Formula of...

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