Voter Identification Laws Revised.docx - Dutton 1 Jason J...

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Dutton 1 Jason J. Dutton GOVT 2306 Mrs. Jacqueline Lanier 4/30/2019 Voter Identification Laws Voter identification laws are laws that require an individual to present a form of identification to be able to cast a ballot on Election Day. The method of identification could be a passport, driving license, military ID, Veterans ID or even a student ID. Voter turnout varies considerably across social and demographic groupings. African-Americans, Hispanics, the poor and the poorly-educated vote less frequently than white, high-earners or highly educated voters (Hill and Leighley, 2016). Widespread failure to vote leads to misrepresentation. This is because politicians become accountable to a particular class of those who voted for them instead of the whole population. Low voter leads to negative consequences due to lack of accurate representation. Voter attendance is positively interrelated to campaign activities and organization plans (Holbrook and McClurg, 2015). Politicians get more votes from areas where they campaigned more compared to less visited areas. Another big determinant of elections is whether voters are registered to vote. There is a negative relationship between registration requirements and voter turnout. Registration is a long tedious process that is expensive for the poor populace. Relaxing voter registration requirements could lead to increased voter turnout on election days (Avery and Peffley, 2014). This research paper seeks to scrutinize the influence of voter identification laws on voter numbers during elections.
Dutton 2 Voter identification laws can lead to discrimination. A huge percentage of those who are barred from voting are African-Americans, Latinos, the poor, transgender, and ex-convicts. Thirty-five states in the United States have regulations that oblige voters to show some form of identification. Eight states have strict photo identification laws. These states are Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and Wisconsin. Voter identification laws have become progressively predominant in the United States since 2000 (National Conference of State Legislatures, 2015). Various other ways are used to verify voters’ identity at polling stations in different states. One way is to check the voter’s signature against the information file. Identifiers in government databases, such as the individual’s name, date of birth, or social security number could also be used. Supporters of voter identification laws argue it could be used to prevent voter impersonation. The public also gets more confident in the election process. The truth is voter identification laws dispossess the majority of their right to vote. This reduces involvement in the electoral process. The most extremely affected voters are low-income earners, racial and ethnic minorities, the aged and people living with disabilities. These groups experience numerous challenges to get IDs or to become registered. The process is either too

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