chapter17 - Chapter 17 Sport Broadcasting Introduction...

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Chapter 17 Sport Broadcasting
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Introduction Electronic media has transformed sport industry and its relationship with public. Today, sports fans can watch events unfold around world as they happen. Broadcasting has also profoundly altered business of sport. Symbiotic relationship Sport entities rely on broadcasters for revenue and publicity. Electronic media know that sporting events are a sure- fire means of attracting audiences that advertisers pay to reach.
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The Electronic Media What is electronic media? Radio, television, and the Internet Sound and images are captured by electronic devices and electronically encoded. Information is transmitted at the speed of light (cables or broadcast transmitters/satellites) to receivers. Information is decoded and transformed back to sound and images. Electronic information can also be recorded for use at a later time.
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History 1800s: Electronic communications began with telegraph (1844) and telephone (1876), which relied on electricity and conductive wires. By World War I, “wireless” (radio) was well established. 1921: First radio broadcasts of sporting events. KDKA in Pittsburgh broadcast first baseball game— Phillies vs. Pirates. WJZ Newark, NJ broadcast Dempsey–Carpentier fight and Yankees–Giants World Series later that year.
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History Network radio allowed many local stations across the country to broadcast the same event. Broadcasters understood that sports sold radios. 1930s: Colleges sold exclusive rights to football games to a sponsor, who then purchased radio time from broadcasters to air games.
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History Radio increased fan support and was a valuable publicity and promotional tool. After World War II: With television, consumers could now both hear and see their heroes in action. 1960s: Growth in sport broadcasting dominated by two men NFL commissioner Alvin “Pete” Rozelle ABC executive Roone Arledge
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History: Rozelle Pete Rozelle NFL pools its regular season and playoff TV rights and sells them to the highest bidder, with
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course SPMT 217 taught by Professor Bouchet during the Spring '08 term at Texas A&M.

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chapter17 - Chapter 17 Sport Broadcasting Introduction...

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