Discussion 4 - Diverse Abilities and Learning.docx -...

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“If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach. If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach. If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, we teach. If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we teach. If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we… teach?.. punish?” (Herner, 1998 as cited by Bryant, Bryant & Smith, 2008, p. 66). This quotation has caused me to assess how teachers respond to students with behavioral problems in spite of the cause. Do we as teachers know how to manage our students’ behaviors? Do we teach according to the curriculum content for classroom and assessments only, or do we teach for application in the real world? If we teach for application in the real world, then when asked “ If a child doesn’t know how to behave” (Herner, 1998 as cited by Bryant, Bryant & Smith, 2008, p. 66) , then our immediate response must ‘be teach’. With this in mind, I analyzed “Case 8.4: Behavior Management Missing the Mark” (Gorski & Pothini, 2018, p. 74). The problems faced in this case included firstly, poor classroom and behavioral management by Mr. Rhett, secondly, Andre and Carson feeling ignored by their teachers and teased by students because they were in special ed. class which led to behavioral problems and thirdly, after Mr. Paulson heard both sides of the issue he is now unsure how to treat with it (Gorski & Pothini). This case depicts three perspectives in this case inclusive of Mr. Paulson’s, Mr. Rhett’s and Andre and Carson’s. Firstly, Mr. Paulson believed that the new reward system could help with behavior issues as he has been able to resolve minor issues in his classroom. Secondly, Mr.

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