Group- Kutupalong Camp.pdf - Sustainable Repatriation of...

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Sustainable Repatriation of Rohingya Refugees:Challenges and Ways ForwardSubmitted To:Fahmida Karim,Course Coordinator,Protection of Refugees,Conducted byUNHCR BangladeshIn collaboration withFaculty of Law, University of DhakaSubmitted By:“Kutupalong Camp”1.Md. Bayjid Rayhan, Roll 42.Md. Mehedi Masud Milon, Roll 83.Md. Sagor Hossain, Roll 304.Md. Jahid-Al-Mamun, Roll 315.Md. Rana Sheikh, Roll 376.Shanta Halder, Roll 677.Md. Shahab Uddin, Roll 798.Mohaimenul Islam, Roll 85Date of Submission:April 5, 2019
iiTable of ContentsIntroduction..........................................................................................................................1The Persecuted Rohingya: Unveiling the Reasons for Becoming Refugees........................2Theoretical Overview: International Law and Refugee Repatriation...................................3Refugee Repatriation: A Durable Solution and Justice System...........................................4Prevailing Circumstances within Myanmar: Do they warrant the efforts towards immediateRohingya Repatriation?........................................................................................................6Sustainable Repatriation: Necessity and Features of an Effective Set of Processes............8Conclusion............................................................................................................................9
1Sustainable Repatriation of Rohingya Refugees: Challenges and Ways ForwardIntroductionThe Rohingya are the most persecuted minority ethnic group in the world.1Originally inhabitants ofthe Rakhine state of Myanmar, they do not have the citizenship of Myanmar or any other country.2As a result of their statelessness, they have been subjected to the denial of the exercise of politicalrights.3But the most serious concern is the breach of their fundamental human rights as they havesuffered unprecedented violence in their native land which has forced them to take refuge mainly inthe bordering country of Bangladesh from time to time.The latest exodus of the Rohingya started in August 2017 and caused the displacement of more than723,000 of them.4The mere number demonstrates the gravity of the man-made calamity. Earlier,hundreds of thousands of the Rohingya had fled successive waves of violence and taken the sameroute for escape in the 1990s.5At present, the Kutupalong refugee camp which hosts most of theRohingya refugees in Bangladesh is the biggest refugee camp in the world.6Bangladesh, as animpoverished nation itself, cannot host the Rohingya refugees for long. In March 2019, Bangladeshhas announced due to its limitations that it will not accept any more refugees.7Besides, thesepersecuted refugees, the vast majority of whom are women and children with more than 40% beingunder the age of 12, do not deserve to live in indescribably inhuman conditions of the crowdedcamps.8The plight of the Rohingya needs to see an end. They have a strong attachment, just like any otherpeople, to the land of their birth, upbringing, identity and heritage, which must be recognized,respected and brought to fulfilment by means of their sustainable repatriation as quickly as possible.

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Term
Spring
Professor
SyedKhaledImran
Tags
Law, Burma, Repatriation

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