APUSH Chapter 5 Notes.docx - Caroline Zager Chapter 5 Notes...

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Caroline Zager Chapter 5 Notes Britain governed most of North America by 1775 (32 colonies), but only 13 colonies had rebelled against the crown by this time. Canada, Jamaica, and others did not rebel. This was due to the social, economic, and political differences between the colonies. Conquest by the Cradle Over the course of the 1700s, the population in the North American colonies exploded. By the end of the century, Britain no longer had more people than its colonies. In 1775, the most populous colonies were Virginia, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and Maryland. About 90% of people lived in rural areas. Colonial America was a melting pot o Germans were 6% of the total population in 1775. Many Germans settled in Pennsylvania, fleeing religious persecution, economic oppression, and the ravages of war o Scots-Irish were 7% of the population in 1775. They were lawless individuals. By the mid 18 th century, a series of Scots-Irish settlements were scattered along the "great wagon road" , which hugged the eastern Appalachian foothills from Pennsylvania to Georgia. The Scots-Irish led the armed march of the Paxton Boys in Philadelphia in 1764 , protesting the Quaker oligarchy's lenient policy toward the Indians. A few years later, they led the Regulator movement in North Carolina, a small but nasty insurrection against eastern domination of the colony's affairs. o About 5% of the multicolored colonial population consisted of other European groups- French Huguenots, Welsh, Dutch, Swedes, Jews, Irish, Swiss, and Scots Highlanders. The Structure of Colonial Society By the mid-1700s, the richest 10% of Bostonians and Philadelphians owned 2/3 of the taxable wealth in their cities. By 1750, Boston contained a large number of homeless poor, who were forced to wear a large red "P" on their clothing.

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