gothic and southern.docx - Characteristics of the Gothic...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 5 pages.

Characteristics of the Gothic Novel The term  Gothic novel  broadly refers to stories that combine elements from horror and  romanticism. The Gothic novel often deals with  supernatural events , or events  occurring in nature that cannot be easily explained or over which man has no control,  and it typically follows a plot of suspense and mystery. Here is a list of some common elements found in Gothic novels: Gloomy, decaying setting (haunted houses or castles with secret passages,  trapdoors, and other mysterious architecture) Supernatural beings or monsters (ghosts, vampires, zombies, giants) Curses or prophecies Damsels in distress Heroes Romance Intense emotions We'll look at a few characteristics - the supernatural, madness, and romance - in more  detail in the following paragraphs, along with classic examples. The Supernatural The Gothic novel arose in part out of the fact that for the English, the late 18th and 19th  centuries were a time of great discovery and exploration in the fields of science, religion, and industry; people both revered and questioned the existence of God or a higher  power. Gothic novels allowed writers and readers to explore these ideas through the  medium of storytelling. Ghosts, death and decay, madness, curses, and so-called  'things that go bump in the night' provided ways to explore fear of the unknown and  what control we have as humans over the unknown. Mary Shelley's classic tale  Frankenstein , first published in 1818, offers a powerful  example of this desire to explore the unknown even as we fear it. Frankenstein's  monster is a man-made creation that eerily merges life and death; Frankenstein  constructs his creation from human body parts and imbues him with life, which at once  gives him great power and a great fear of that power because he realizes that he's  created a being that he cannot entirely control. His fear of his own creation emerges 
from his recognition that he cannot ever fully understand or control the forces of life and  death, despite all of his scientific knowledge. Madness The Gothic can also refer to stories involving strange and troubling events that, while  they have logical, natural explanations, seem to originate from unexpected forces.  Charlotte Bronte employs this element of the Gothic in  Jane Eyre , published in 1847.  While living in Thornfield Hall as a governess, Jane frequently hears strange noises and laughter coming from the third story of the mansion that no one will explain, and odd  things keep happening in the dead of night, such as her master Mr. Rochester's bed  catching fire and an attack on a guest. Eventually Jane discovers that all of this is the 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture