WCA 2.pdf - Exercise​ ​1 1 Even​ ​after​...

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Unformatted text preview: Exercise​ ​1 1. Even​ ​after​ ​her​ ​leg​ ​was​ ​amputated,​ ​Sarah​ ​Bernhardt​ ​toured​ ​Europe​ ​and​ ​the​ ​United States. a. “Use​ ​a​ ​comma​ ​after​ ​a​ ​word​ ​group​ ​that​ ​introduces​ ​an​ ​independent​ ​clause​ ​(word group​ ​that​ ​can​ ​stand​ ​alone​ ​as​ ​a​ ​sentence).” 2. The​ ​professor’s​ ​warm​ ​gentle​ ​voice,​ ​soothed​ ​the​ ​weary​ ​frustrated​ ​students. a. “Use​ ​a​ ​comma​ ​between​ ​coordinate​ ​adjectives” 3. The​ ​Maya​ ​are​ ​famous​ ​for​ ​their​ ​calendar,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Aztecs​ ​are​ ​notorious​ ​for​ ​their​ ​human sacrifices. a. “Use​ ​a​ ​comma​ ​before​ ​a​ ​coordinating​ ​conjunction​ ​(for,​ ​and,​ ​nor,​ ​but,​ ​or,​ ​yet,​ ​so) that​ ​joins​ ​two​ ​independent​ ​clauses.” 4. Shakespeare’s​ ​first​ ​tragedy,​ ​Titus​ ​Andronicus,​ ​was​ ​a​ ​big​ ​hit;​ ​today​ ​however​ ​it​ ​is​ ​not regarded​ ​highly. a. “Use​ ​commas​ ​to​ ​set​ ​off​ ​the​ ​nonrestrictive​ ​elements​ ​in​ ​sentences.” 5. The​ ​tsunami​ ​ravaged​ ​Sri​ ​Lanka,​ ​where​ ​hundreds​ ​of​ ​people​ ​lost​ ​their​ ​lives. a. “Use​ ​commas​ ​to​ ​set​ ​off​ ​the​ ​nonrestrictive​ ​elements​ ​in​ ​sentences.” Exercise​ ​2 1. William​ ​Shakespeare​ ​and​ ​his​ ​wife​ ​Anne,​ ​had​ ​three​ ​children:​ ​Susanna,​ ​Hamnet,​ ​and Judith. a. “Use​ ​a​ ​colon​ ​after​ ​an​ ​independent​ ​clause​ ​that​ ​introduces​ ​a​ ​list.” 2. Greeks​ ​invented​ ​drama;​ ​Americans​ ​invented​ ​rock​ ​‘n’​ ​roll. a. “Use​ ​a​ ​semicolon​ ​between​ ​two​ ​closely​ ​related​ ​independent​ ​clauses.” 3. Heraclitus​ ​gives​ ​the​ ​best​ ​advice​ ​about​ ​the​ ​phenomenological​ ​world:​ ​“You​ ​cannot​ ​step into​ ​the​ ​same​ ​river​ ​twice.” a. “Use​ ​a​ ​colon​ ​after​ ​an​ ​independent​ ​clause​ ​that​ ​introduces​ ​a​ ​quotation” 4. He​ ​wants​ ​to​ ​move​ ​to​ ​a​ ​midwestern​ ​college​ ​town:​ ​Madison,​ ​home​ ​of​ ​the​ ​University​ ​of Wisconsin;​ ​Iowa​ ​City,​ ​home​ ​of​ ​the​ ​University​ ​of​ ​Iowa;​ ​or​ ​Ann​ ​Arbor,​ ​home​ ​of​ ​the University​ ​of​ ​Michigan. a. “Use​ ​a​ ​colon​ ​after​ ​an​ ​independent​ ​clause​ ​that​ ​introduces​ ​a​ ​list.” b. “Use​ ​semicolons​ ​between​ ​items​ ​in​ ​a​ ​series​ ​that​ ​contain​ ​internal​ ​commas.” 5. Leticia​ ​loves​ ​the​ ​Oxford​ ​comma;​ ​Dolores,​ ​however,​ ​does​ ​not. a. “Use​ ​a​ ​semicolon​ ​between​ ​independent​ ​clauses​ ​that​ ​are​ ​linked​ ​by​ ​a​ ​transition.” Exercise​ ​3 1. Some​ ​scholars​ ​believe​ ​that​ ​Queen​ ​Elizabeth’s​ ​England​ ​was​ ​the​ ​western​ ​world's​ ​first modern​ ​police​ ​state. a. “Add​’s​ ​to​ ​make​ ​the​ ​possessive​ ​form​ ​of​ ​the​ ​following:​ ​singular​ ​nouns,​ ​plural​ ​nouns that​ ​do​ ​not​ ​end​ ​in​ ​-s,​ ​and​ ​indefinite​ ​pronouns.” 2. It’s​ ​easy​ ​to​ ​poke​ ​fun​ ​at​ ​the​ ​clothing​ ​styles​ ​of​ ​the​ ​70s​ ​and​ ​80s. a. “Use​ ​an​ ​apostrophe​ ​to​ ​replace​ ​omitted​ ​letters​ ​or​ ​numerals​ ​in​ ​contractions.” 3. Conversation​ ​of​ ​our​ ​planet's’​ ​natural​ ​resources​ ​is​ ​everyone’s​ ​concern. a. “Add​’s​ ​to​ ​make​ ​the​ ​possessive​ ​form​ ​of​ ​the​ ​following:​ ​singular​ ​nouns,​ ​plural​ ​nouns that​ ​do​ ​not​ ​end​ ​in​ ​-s,​ ​and​ ​indefinite​ ​pronouns.” 4. Toni​ ​Morrison's​ ​novels​ ​aren’t​ ​difficult​ ​for​ ​readers​ ​familiar​ ​with​ ​William​ ​Faulkner's​ ​work. a. “Use​ ​an​ ​apostrophe​ ​to​ ​replace​ ​omitted​ ​letters​ ​or​ ​numerals​ ​in​ ​contractions.” b. “Add​’s​ ​to​ ​make​ ​the​ ​possessive​ ​form​ ​of​ ​the​ ​following:​ ​singular​ ​nouns,​ ​plural​ ​nouns that​ ​do​ ​not​ ​end​ ​in​ ​-s,​ ​and​ ​indefinite​ ​pronouns.” 5. He​ ​rebuilt​ ​his​ ​parent’s​ ​house​ ​after​ ​its​ ​destruction​ ​by​ ​fire​ ​in​ ​1991. a. “Use​ ​an​ ​apostrophe​ ​to​ ​replace​ ​omitted​ ​letters​ ​or​ ​numerals​ ​in​ ​contractions.” Exercise​ ​4 I​ ​admit​ ​that​ ​I​ ​do​ ​not​ ​think​ ​writing​ ​is​ ​one​ ​of​ ​my​ ​strong​ ​suits,​ ​so​ ​it​ ​is​ ​not​ ​my​ ​favorite​ ​thing​ ​to do.​ ​However,​ ​I​ ​do​ ​like​ ​to​ ​write​ ​when​ ​I’m​ ​given​ ​a​ ​deep,​ ​thought-provoking​ ​prompt.​ ​Something that​ ​gives​ ​me​ ​a​ ​lot​ ​to​ ​learn​ ​about,​ ​and​ ​a​ ​lot​ ​to​ ​speak​ ​on.​ ​I​ ​like​ ​writing​ ​about​ ​various​ ​topics,​ ​using various​ ​styles​ ​of​ ​writing.​ ​I​ ​prefer​ ​kinds​ ​of​ ​writing​ ​such​ ​as​ ​persuasive.​ ​I​ ​like​ ​taking​ ​a​ ​stance​ ​on​ ​a topic,​ ​sticking​ ​to​ ​it,​ ​and​ ​covering​ ​it​ ​completely. When​ ​writing​ ​about​ ​whatever​ ​I​ ​choose,​ ​I​ ​struggle​ ​with​ ​coming​ ​up​ ​with​ ​a​ ​topic​ ​on​ ​my​ ​own. Furthermore,​ ​I​ ​feel​ ​as​ ​though​ ​I​ ​perform​ ​better​ ​and​ ​have​ ​a​ ​stronger​ ​argument​ ​and​ ​piece​ ​of writing​ ​when​ ​I’m​ ​given​ ​a​ ​solid​ ​topic.​ ​A​ ​strength​ ​of​ ​mine​ ​would​ ​probably​ ​be​ ​coming​ ​up​ ​and​ ​finding supporting​ ​evidence.​ ​A​ ​limit​ ​of​ ​mine​ ​when​ ​it​ ​comes​ ​to​ ​my​ ​writing​ ​would​ ​be​ ​sometimes​ ​I​ ​find myself​ ​being​ ​a​ ​little​ ​repetitive​ ​with​ ​my​ ​main​ ​idea​ ​and​ ​my​ ​major​ ​supporting​ ​details.​ ​When​ ​it comes​ ​to​ ​my​ ​writing,​ ​I​ ​sometimes​ ​struggle​ ​with​ ​correct​ ​comma​ ​placement.​ ​Another​ ​limitation​ ​of mine​ ​is​ ​at​ ​times​ ​not​ ​being​ ​able​ ​to​ ​see​ ​errors​ ​until​ ​I​ ​either​ ​read​ ​it​ ​outloud​ ​or​ ​someone​ ​else​ ​reads over​ ​it​ ​and​ ​points​ ​them​ ​out. In​ ​school,​ ​when​ ​I​ ​was​ ​learning​ ​to​ ​write,​ ​the​ ​first​ ​thing​ ​we​ ​learned​ ​about​ ​writing​ ​a​ ​good essay​ ​or​ ​piece​ ​of​ ​writing​ ​is​ ​to​ ​plan​ ​it​ ​out.​ ​To​ ​know​ ​what​ ​you're​ ​going​ ​to​ ​say​ ​and​ ​where​ ​you're going​ ​to​ ​say​ ​it.​ ​That​ ​way,​ ​you​ ​make​ ​sure​ ​you​ ​get​ ​your​ ​point​ ​across,​ ​and​ ​you​ ​have​ ​enough evidence​ ​to​ ​back​ ​it​ ​up.​ ​Since​ ​then,​ ​whenever​ ​I​ ​have​ ​to​ ​write,​ ​I​ ​always​ ​have​ ​to​ ​plan​ ​it​ ​out​ ​typically in​ ​a​ ​map​ ​form.​ ​It​ ​helps​ ​me​ ​visualize​ ​how​ ​my​ ​piece​ ​of​ ​writing​ ​is​ ​going​ ​to​ ​come​ ​together​ ​and where​ ​the​ ​areas​ ​I​ ​need​ ​to​ ​work​ ​on​ ​are.​ ​I​ ​also​ ​the​ ​majority​ ​of​ ​the​ ​time​ ​I​ ​do​ ​not​ ​write​ ​my​ ​intro​ ​first, because​ ​if​ ​I​ ​do​ ​I​ ​end​ ​up​ ​changing​ ​it​ ​anyway​ ​to​ ​match​ ​the​ ​rest. I​ ​have​ ​a​ ​lot​ ​of​ ​room​ ​to​ ​improve​ ​when​ ​it​ ​comes​ ​to​ ​writing,​ ​I​ ​demonstrate​ ​my​ ​writing​ ​skills​ ​a lot​ ​better​ ​when​ ​I​ ​am​ ​given​ ​a​ ​topic,​ ​and​ ​I​ ​always​ ​have​ ​to​ ​plan​ ​out​ ​my​ ​writing​ ​first. ...
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  • Winter '15
  • Carol Maguire

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