Brown vs. Board of Education.docx - Julie Mueller Rabbi Ben...

  • No School
  • AA 1
  • 4

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 4 pages.

Julie MuellerRabbi BenChallenges of Democracy3 May 2017Brown v. Board of EducationRegarded as one of the key influential cases in the ending of segregation between AfricanAmericans and whites, Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansasset precedent for a newfound equality among races. Originally brought to court in December of 1952, this U.S. Supreme Court case was actually comprised of five separate cases from the states of Kansas, Virginia, South Carolina, and Delaware (“Brown v. Board of Education”). They were: Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Briggs v. Elliot, Davis v. Board of Education of Prince Edward County, Boiling v. Sharpe,and Gebhart v. Ethel(“History - Brown v. Board”). While each case was slightly different, the main issue in each revolved around African American children being denied admission to schools attended by white children. When first brought to court, the purpose of this case was to review the segregation law set in place by Plessy v. Fergusonin 1896. By arguing that the segregation of African Americans and whites was inherently unequal, they hoped the court would find it to be in violation of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Under the Fourteenth Amendment, the rights of all citizens are clearly defined. One of the most prominent clauses in this Amendment is the Equal Protection Clause that essentially mandates the states to treat all individuals in the same manner, in terms of the law (“14th Amendment”). Believing that segregation violated this constitutional law, the Plaintiffs hoped to win the case.
Background image
Image of page 2

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 4 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes