FINAL - A a bandy-legged smith – W.B Yeats’ “A Prayer...

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Unformatted text preview: A- a bandy-legged smith – W.B. Yeats’ “A Prayer for My Daughter”, refers to Hephaestus, crippled son of Zeus and blacksmith of the gods who was married to Aphrodite- a boy falling out of the sky – Auden’s “Musee des Beaux Arts”, Brueghel’s The Fall of Icarus- A condition of complete simplicity – T.S. Eliot, “Little Gidding” from Four Quartets- A drunken, vain-glorious lout – Yeats’ “Easter, 1916”, Major John MacBride, husband of Maude Gonne- a few long grey hairs – D.H. Lawrence, “Sorrow” re: carrying his mother down the stairs- a limestone landscape – W.H. Auden, “In Praise of Limestone” Inspired by the limestone landscape outside Florence, Italy, where W.H.A. and his partner Chester Kallman stayed.- a soft October night – T.S. Eliot, “Lovesong of J. Alfred Prufrock”- a strong brown god – T.S. Eliot, “The Dry Salvages” from Four Quartets- a time-torn man – Thomas Hardy, “A Broken Appointment” ‘Once you, a woman, came/To soothe a time-torn man; even though it be/You love not me?//’- aabbcddc – rhyme scheme for Yeat’s “Byzantium”- aba cac dcd eee – rhyme scheme for Philip Larkin’s “Talking in Bed”- abab cdcd efeffe – rhyme scheme for Thomas Hardy’s “Hap” Anglo-Italian sonnet- abab cdcd efgefg- abababcc – rhyme scheme for ottava rima poems. Yeats used it in “Sailing to Byzantium” and “Among School Children” - ababb – a cinquain- ababbcc – rhyme royal, used by Auden for “Letter to Lord Byron” and parts of “Shield of Achilles” and Yeats for “A Bronze Head”- ababcadcd – used by Philip Larkin for “Church Going”- ababcbca – used by Gerard Manley Hopkins for The Wreck of The Deutschland- ababcdcd efggfe – used by W.H. Auden for “Who’s Who” another Anglo-Italian sonnet- ababcdcdefefgg – Shakespearean sonnet- ababcddc – used for Philip Larkin’s “Here”- ababcdecde – traditional rhyme scheme for an ode. *NOTE* cannot find an example from our readings.- abba abba ccd ccd – one form of a Petrarchian sonnet- abba cddc efe fef – form of sonnet *NOTE* can’t find anything specific about this.- abbaabba cdc dcd – rhyme scheme for Gerard Manley Hopkins’ “The Windhover”- abbcac – used by Philip Larkin for “An Arundel Tomb”- abcbb – *NOTE* Don’t know. Thought it might have something to do with Hardy or Houseman- abcbdb abcbab ababcb ababab – rhyme scheme of Thomas Hardy’s “Shut Out That Moon” – a kind of Poikilomorphism.- abccab - *NOTE* cannot find information re: abccab scheme.- After the first death – Dylan Thomas, “A Refusal to Mourn the Death, by Fire, of a Child in London” final line, ‘After the first death, there is no other.’- All we can hope to leave them now – Philip Larkin, “Homage to a Government” final line, ‘All we can hope to leave them now is money.’- anacoluthon - The failure, accidental or deliberate, to complete a sentence according to the structural...
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FINAL - A a bandy-legged smith – W.B Yeats’ “A Prayer...

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