HAI FINAL.docx - Running head:PREVENTING HEALTHCARE-ASSOCIATED INFECTIONS IN HEMODIALYSIS Preventing Healthcare-Associated Infections in Hemodialysis

HAI FINAL.docx - Running head:PREVENTING...

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Running head:PREVENTING HEALTHCARE-ASSOCIATED INFECTIONS IN HEMODIALYSIS Preventing Healthcare-Associated Infections in Hemodialysis Jessie Wharton Grand Canyon University: NRS-490VN April 28, 2019
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2 PREVENTING HEALTHCARE-ASSOCIATED INFECTIONS IN HEMODIALYSIS Preventing Healthcare-Associated Infections in Hemodialysis Background Healthcare-Associated Infections, or HAIs, are infections that patients get while receiving medical treatment (“Healthcare-Associated Infections”, n.d.). HAIs can occur in any kind of healthcare setting, including dialysis centers, but most of these infections are preventable with proper infection control. The focus of this paper is to learn how HAIs are spread, the impact they have on patient outcomes and medical professionals, the significance to nursing, and how they can be prevented. According to Healthy People 2020, HAIs have been linked to causing increased morbidity and mortality in the United States and are also a reason for substantial increases in healthcare year by year (“Healthcare-Associated Infections”, n.d.). Problem Statement Patients with end stage renal disease are already facing life with a compromised immune system, but when you put them together in a large room with multiple patients with other diseases, illnesses, and the continuous exposure to the bloodstream, it really stacks the odds in infection’s favor. Patients have either a fistula, graft, or a central catheter as an access to dialyze them. According to the CDC, bloodstream infections are a dangerous complication of dialysis, as roughly 370,000 people rely on this treatment to sustain their lives (“Dialysis Safety”, 2018). In order to prevent infection to all of these accesses, it is critical that all healthcare professionals that take care of these patients be properly educated on technique, as well as continuously educating their patients’ on how to prevent infections at home. For example, removing the pressure dressing from their fistula or graft no longer after twenty-four hours after their treatment, or keeping their catheter dressing dry at all times.
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3 PREVENTING HEALTHCARE-ASSOCIATED INFECTIONS IN HEMODIALYSIS As mentioned above, these patients are at a dangerously high risk for infection at all times, but the staff of a hemodialysis unit are also vulnerable to HAIs due to frequent and prolonged exposure to many contaminants (Karkar, 2018). Infection is the number one causes of hospitalizations for dialysis patients and the second leading causes of mortality. For the patient, infections can mean more medications, a trip to the hospital, or even death. Once a patient has an infection, they may never fully recover to the state they were in before the infection, such as a diabetic patient on dialysis gets an infection in their fistula. The fistula may have to be removed or deemed unfit for cannulation from the damage of the infection, and then have to have a central catheter placed as a temporary access until they can be revaluated for another fistula or graft.
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