Galactic Structures and Distances

Galactic Structures - celestial bodies of known magnitude Pictures were used to determine the galaxy type After this calculations were done to find

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Galactic Structures and Distances Parker R. Watson April 10, 2007 Adam Trotter Astronomy 101 Section 412 “I pledge that I have neither given nor received any unauthorized aid on this report.”
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Data and Calculations VISUAL MAG. TELESCOPI C MAG. GALACTIC TYPE ABSOLUTE MAG. MAG. DIFF. RECESSIO N VEL. DIST. 4.5 19.5 E0 -20 39.5 75000 750 4 19 S0 -20 39 45000 625 3.5 18.5 Sa -19 37.5 30000 275 3 18 E0 -20 38 15000 350 2.5 15.5 Sb -19 34.5 7500 75 2 15 SBb -18 33 3000 35 1.5 11.5 Sb -19 30.5 1500 12 1 11 SBc -17 28 750 3 Hubble Constant 9.9x10 -5 To calculate the telescopic magnitude, a simple correction was made by adding a given value, depending on the type of telescope used, to the visual magnitude value. To find the magnitude difference, the absolute magnitude (given) was subtracted from the telescopic magnitude. Using a given graph and the magnitude difference, the distance was determined also. To find Hubble’s constant, a “LineReg” feature was used on the TI-83 to determine the slope of the line. Conclusions First, the visual magnitude was recorded in a table by comparing a galaxy to other
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Unformatted text preview: celestial bodies of known magnitude. Pictures were used to determine the galaxy type. After this, calculations were done to find different values. This experiment is pertinent because it shows how astronomers might use field observations to prove or disprove Hubble’s law. It also helps show how to calculate and/or find the telescopic magnitude, galactic type, magnitude difference, and distance. There may possibly be two sources of error for this experiment. One is the measuring of the visual magnitude. If this measurement is wrong, it necessarily makes the rest of the data collected wrong also. The other possible source of error in the calculation of the Hubble constant is choosing the wrong graph to find the slope. If the wrong graph were to be used to find the constant, the slope would be completely wrong....
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course ASTR 101 taught by Professor Christiansen during the Fall '08 term at UNC.

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Galactic Structures - celestial bodies of known magnitude Pictures were used to determine the galaxy type After this calculations were done to find

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