Lunar Obsrvations Lab

Lunar Obsrvations Lab - Lunar Observations Lab Parker R....

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Lunar Observations Lab Parker R. Watson April 3, 2007 Adam Trotter Astronomy 101 Section 412 “I pledge that I have neither given nor received any unauthorized aid on this report.”
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Data and Analysis These pictures are borrowed from The Lunar Landscape . They show different parts of the geography of the near side of the moon that I observed during the lab. To calculate the angle of the moon, we measured the time it took the moon to leave the field of view of the telescope. Half of the moon took 1 minute and 28 seconds; thus, the moon took approximately 2 minutes and 56 seconds to leave the field of view. To calculate the angle, I used the formula Rate = Angle / Change in Time. I plugged 15 minutes of arc in
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for the rate and 2 minutes and 56 seconds in for the change in time and solved accordingly. The final answer was 44 minutes of arc. Discussion The moon has several types of geographical formations. One very common one on the near side of the moon are Maria. They cover about sixteen percent of the moon,
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course ASTR 101 taught by Professor Christiansen during the Fall '08 term at UNC.

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Lunar Obsrvations Lab - Lunar Observations Lab Parker R....

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