Japanese Internment Sources (1).docx - Why were Japanese Americans Incarcerated during World War II 1 Watch the following clip Source A and then

Japanese Internment Sources (1).docx - Why were Japanese...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 6 pages.

Why were Japanese Americans Incarcerated during World War II?1.Watch the following clip, Source A, and then complete the graphic organizer below.This newsreel was made by the United States government sometime in the middle of 1942 to explain its reasons and strategies for incarcerating Japanese Americans. These kinds of films were made to be shown theaters before the main feature, and movie viewership was fairly high in the 1940s.and complete the graphic organizer below. Source A:DocumentReasons for incarceration suggested by this sourceEvidence from source to support these reasonsGovernment NewsreelDate: 1943-fear for the security of USA-Pearl Harbor Many families sold their homes, their stores, and most of their assets. They could not be certain their homes and livelihoods would still be there upon their return. Because of the mad rush to sell, properties and inventories were often sold at a fraction of their true value.Hypothesis 1: Why were Japanese Americans incarcerated during World WarII?On December 7, 1941, just hours after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, theFBIrounded-up 1,291 Japanese community and religious leaders, arresting themwithout evidence and freezing their assets.2. Read Sources B and C and then complete the graphic organizer that follows.Source B: The Munson ReportIn 1941 President Roosevelt ordered the State Department to investigate the loyalty of Japanese Americans. Special Representative of the State Department Curtis B. Munson carried out the investigation in October and November of 1941. The product of this investigation became known as the “Munson Report,” and it was presented to President Roosevelt on November 7, 1941. The excerpt below is from the 25-page report.
There is no Japanese ‘problem’ on the Coast. There will be no armed uprising of Japanese. There will undoubtedly be some sabotage financed by Japan and executed largely by imported agents. . . . In each Naval District there are about 250 to 300 suspects under surveillance. It is easy to get on the suspect list, merely a speech in favor of Japan at some banquet being sufficient to land one there. The Intelligence Services are generous with the title of suspect and are taking no chances. Privately, they believe that only 50 or 60 in each district can be classed as really dangerous. The Japanese are hampered as saboteurs because of their easily recognized physical appearance. It will be hard for them to get near anything to blow up if it is guarded. There is far more danger from Communists and people of the Bridges type on the Coast than there is from Japanese. The Japanese here is almost exclusively a farmer, a

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture