WK 6 6501 discussion.docx - WK 6 6501 discussion According to scenario 2 for this week\u2019s discussion Kevin is a 6-year-old boy who is brought in for

WK 6 6501 discussion.docx - WK 6 6501 discussion According...

This preview shows page 1 out of 2 pages.

Unformatted text preview: WK 6 6501 discussion According to scenario 2 for this week’s discussion; Kevin is a 6-year-old boy who is brought in for evaluation by his parents. His parents report that his deep cough, which emulate barking sounds have been present for a week and previously was in good health. His cough does produce some mucus and occasional vomiting, however no blood in either. The parents report that Kevin has only had a low-grade temperature as far as they know as they do not own a thermometer. As for Kevin’s past medical history, they report Kevin has never had childhood asthma or RSV. They also report they are not sure if his immunizations are current as they have moved around a lot in the first two years of Kevin’s life. Respiratory Alterations in Children Leaning towards croup as the diagnosis for Kevin, according to Huether & McCance (2017), croup occurs in children six months to 5 years of age almost always with acute laryngotracheitis. In Kevin's case, a diagnosis of spasmodic croup since spasmodic croups mostly occur in older children (Huether & McCance, 2017). The clinical manifestations of croup include a few days of rhinorrhea, sore throat, low-grade fever, then slowly develops to a harsh barking cough, hoarse voice and inspiratory stridor (Huether & McCance, 2017). Although we cannot be sure on Kevin’s vaccines, croup can be viral like RSV, rhinovirus, adenovirus, rubella virus, or atypical bacteria (Huether & McCance, 2017). The Pathophysiology of Croup Viral croup pathophysiology is mainly caused by subglottic inflammation and edema due to the infection (Huether & McCance, 2017). The mucosal membrane of the larynx adheres tightly to the underlying cartilage, whereas those of the subglottic space are looser and thus allowing for the accumulation of mucosal and sub-mucosal edema (Huether & McCance, 2017). Spasmodic croup also causes obstruction but with reduced inflammation and edema; increased airflow resistance leads to increased respiratory work which results in more negative intrathoracic pressures, thus increasing the collapse of the upper airway in turn(Huether & McCance, 2017). Gender and Genetics Croup is more common among boys rather than girls (Rennie et al., 2013). About 15% of the children affected have a strong family history of croup according to Huether & McCance (2017). A study by Pruikkonen, Dunder, Renko, Pokka, & Uhari (2009), confirmed that croup's family history was the main risk factor in croup and its recurrence among the siblings and parents of the studied cases. Huether, S. E., & McCance, K. L. (2017). Understanding pathophysiology (6th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby. Pruikkonen, H., Dunder, T., Renko, M., Pokka, T., & Uhari, M. (2009). Risk factors for croup in children with recurrent respiratory infections: a case-control study. Paediatric And Perinatal Epidemiology, 23(2), 153-159. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3016.2008.00986.x Rennie, D. C., Karunanayake, C. P., Chen, Y., Nakagawa, K., Pahwa, P., Senthilselvan, A., & Dosman, J. A. (2013). CD14 gene variants and their importance for childhood croup, atopy, and asthma. Disease Markers, 35(6), 765-771. doi:10.1155/2013/434920 ...
View Full Document

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture