SOCIOLOGICAL_FRAMEWORK_for_Youth_Min.by_Dr._Dave_Rahn1.doc...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 14 pages.

A Sociological Framework for Doing Youth Ministry by   Dave Rahn, Ph.D. Chapter 4 in  Reaching a Generation for Christ    (Dunn & Senter; 1997, Moody) Many   youth   leaders   get   blindsided   by   an   important   realization   after   some experience with kids.  It's the kind of truth that can take your breath away, sort of like the first jump into a swimming pool that's a little colder than anticipated.  Here's how it goes: “Youth meetings might be well paced, engaging, and meaningful--but that's not why kids attend.  They also don't show up because the youth leader is cool, witty, and easy to listen to.  Rather, most kids get involved in a youth ministry because it gives them a chance to connect with the people they want to be with.” The initial awareness of this youth ministry fact-of-life typically produces two effects on an erstwhile youth leader.  The first is to thank the Lord for the unanticipated splash of humility this truth carries.   After all, indulging in the temptation of self- importance can be quite a tug for any youth minister.  The second is to thank the Lord for the expected benefit that this profound insight will bring to any ministry with adolescents. Understanding the social framework for doing youth ministry can be like finding the light switch   in   a   dimly   lit   room.     With   the   new   improved   visibility   come   tremendous possibilities.  My goal for this chapter is to help youth ministry folks to think critically about the role of social and cultural context in determining ministry forms and methods. By shedding a little light on the subject I hope to provoke creative youth ministry responses. Social contexts shape all of us.  Chances are better than average that our junior high and senior high school years contributed richly to our present formation.   Our personal socio-developmental tools--the ones that have carried us into adulthood--were test-driven in our adolescent years.   It isn't too difficult to tap into this mother lode of memories.  Do you remember your first kiss?  Or the first time your hormones seemed to
be going on “red alert”?  How about the first time you drove a car, or, better yet, the first time you drove solo to pick up a friend?  Can you remember what it felt like in your first year at high school, and how incredibly old the seniors seemed?  Did you ever experience rejection from a group of persons you wanted to belong to?  Can you identify a time when you felt as if you finally belonged to a group, that they were a perfect fit for you?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture