SOC 160 - Reading Response 1.pdf - Islas 1 Jennyfer Islas...

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Islas 1Jennyfer Islas Reading Response 1 While capital may take on many material forms such as art, property, and money, as Bourdieu points out, capital can also be embodied in a person (1986:70). In his work, Bourdieu introduces the concept of cultural capital which he defines as the class-based skills and knowledge an individual learns from their family and by also recognizing their own place in society (1986: 111). As Bourdieu explains, from an early age, children internalize habits, skills, and dispositions they learn from their parents which become compiled into their habitus (1986:6). One’s habitus thus becomes the unconscious enactment of one’s cultural capital which helps guide an individual toward understanding their appropriate social position and practicing behaviors that are suitable for them while simultaneously promoting inequality between different classes (1986:260). Seeing as the accumulation and transmission of cultural capital takes long amounts of time, working-class and lower class parents may not have the economic or cultural means of transmitting cultural capital onto their children (1986:53,54). On the other hand, parents belonging to the upper-classes have the resources that allow them to free up their time in order to transmit cultural capital into their children. In her work, Lareau points out that class-based forms of childrearing can be distinguished in society as a result of the different amount of cultural capital that a parent is able to transmit into their child (2002:748,771). According to Lareau,

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