139142 - TeachingEnglish Lesson plans Lesson Plan \u2013 Talking about advertising This lesson was created for Intermediate level students but could be

139142 - TeachingEnglish Lesson plans Lesson Plan u2013...

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TeachingEnglish Lesson plans © BBC | British Council 2009 Lesson Plan – Talking about advertising This lesson was created for Intermediate level students but could be adapted for other levels. It is a two hour lesson but depending on the students could vary. The individual stages of the lesson can be varied or even omitted, but have been designed to move the class from short activities in which they build and explore their ideas on a topic, to longer activities allowing free expression of these ideas. Although I encourage its use, I don’t compel students to reproduce language learned in the early part of the class because I am firmly of the opinion that free and open expression is the best way to improve fluency. Vocabulary lead in I draw a circle in the middle of the board and write some words around it, for example, revenue, profit, market research, publicity, prime time, full page, classified, flyer and ask the class to guess the theme, i.e. the missing word in the middle. Invariably, intermediate students get the answer quickly enough, so we focus on the words, and add more, to get everybody fully on topic. Then I give them some sentences (see Appendix) and ask them to try to deduce the meaning of the bold words from the context. This can be challenging but feel free to amend the document and introduce easier lexis. We feed back as a whole group and I give any guidance necessary. Advertising doesn’t pay I give the class (or project onto the screen, wall etc.) a short anecdote about a man who refuses to advertise and ask them to discuss its message, in pairs. Consider, a man wakes up in the morning after sleeping on an advertised bed in advertised pyjamas. He will bathe in an advertised bath, wash with advertised soap, shave with an advertised razor, have a breakfast of advertised juice, cereal and toast which was toasted in an advertised toaster, put on advertised clothes and look at the time on his advertised watch. He will drive to work in an advertised car, sit at an advertised computer, drink his favourite advertised drink and write with his advertised pen. Yet this man hesitates to advertise, saying that advertising does not pay. Finally, when it is too late and his unadvertised business goes broke, he will then advertise it for sale. Generally, the response is that advertising is very important for companies, and that without it business is not possible. And although I’m not known for my sympathy for the marketing men and women of this world, I am generally pleased to get this from my students, as it sets the agenda for a successful conversation. What advertised products do you have? I ask students in pairs to think, and speak honestly about all the things they have in their house that have been advertised. Perhaps they could say what they have, how it was advertised, and who bought it. Many find at this stage that they don’t have ‘anything to say’, but a little prompting does tend to remind them, even something as mundane as washing powder can give us something to talk about.

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