Wines term paper 1 - 1 KK Carothers Term Paper 1 Anick/Merwin Wines and Vines 28 February 2007"The Heart of it All Ohios Current Potential for Wine

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KK Carothers Term Paper 1 Anick/Merwin Wines and Vines 28 February 2007 “The Heart of it All” Ohio’s Current Potential for Wine Grape Growing in a Booming Market The wine industry’s booming growth to the average consumer is obvious. The February front cover of Fortune magazine reads “Drink Wine and Live Longer”. The business headline of The News Herald (a Cleveland newspaper) states, “Wine-the $162 billion industry”. The Naples Daily News ’ front page focuses on the Naples Winter Wine Festival, which notes “$45,000: The winning bid on 10 bottles of wine-the lowest winning bid in 2006”. The Midwest state Ohio has the potential to partake in the industry. When considering the manufacturing location of wines, however, places like Napa Valley, California, France, Spain, and Italy immediately rise to the forefront, not Ohio; the phrase “Knee high by the fourth of July” is popular lingo among the state and its reputation holds that the landscape can produce nothing but corn and pumpkins. Contrary to the preconception, Ohio actually can harbor not only productive vineyards but can also create prize-worthy wines. Jeff Cox states in his book From Vines to Wines that “The Ohio River valley was once known as the ‘Rhine of America’, before Prohibition wrecked viticulture in this country” (Cox). Even though Ohio’s industry ranks high among U.S. 1
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states (it currently holds the sixth in the nation for most professional vintners (Warren)), certainly it can still grow and expand. Understandably, a wine produced in Ohio will not seem as glamorous to the popular market as a wine from France or even California, but if the possibility exists to grow grapes and make tasteful wine, then Ohio should strive for success. Cox later explains that Ohio’s conditions are ideal for grape growing, primarily white grapes. By examining the physical characteristics of Ohio’s primed fields (soil, climate, and topography), the market’s overall increasing demand for wines (particularly Rieslings), and possibility for improving the state’s economic growth, the future is clear for Ohio to become a leader in the wine business. Because of Ohio’s ideal growing conditions, the number of wineries has already increased; from 1997-2004, the amount boosted from 43 to over 80 (Dami). Contributing to the success is Ohio’s high soil quality. Ideally, soils must be permeable, low in nutrients, and have a slightly acidic pH, especially for French American hybrids and American varieties (Cox). Geographically the best sites that fulfill the aforementioned characteristics exist in northern Ohio, near the Great Lakes, and south near the Ohio
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course HORT 1104 taught by Professor Arnink,k./merwin,i during the Spring '07 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Wines term paper 1 - 1 KK Carothers Term Paper 1 Anick/Merwin Wines and Vines 28 February 2007"The Heart of it All Ohios Current Potential for Wine

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