Crane - EAD-533 - Benchmark - Leading Leaders in Giving Peer Feedback Related to Teacher Performance - Benchmark Leading Leaders in Giving Peer Feedback

Crane - EAD-533 - Benchmark - Leading Leaders in Giving Peer Feedback Related to Teacher Performance

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Benchmark: Leading Leaders in Giving Peer Feedback Related to Teacher Performance Thomas W. Crane Grand Canyon University EAD – 533 Dr. Karla Carlson May 08, 2019
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1 Benchmark: Leading Leaders in Giving Peer Feedback related to Teacher Performance Introduction One of the many duties of a school administrator is to observe, evaluate, and provide feedback on teachers’ performance. To accomplish this effectively the instructional leader must build a culture of trust and respect between them and their staff. This will result in teachers who are more likely to buy into the school’s vision and mission and more likely to work longer and harder to ensure the success of the students, as well as the school (Modoono, 2017). When performing teacher evaluations, it is important to discuss one’s expectations regarding the upcoming visitation in a pre-observation conference. The administrator must be explicit on what they are intending to observe. For example, they may explain they will be looking for evidence of student collaboration and use of technology. During the observation, the administrator must not exhibit body language or facial expressions which may be perceived as disapproving. This is especially true during observations of newer staff. Any type of expression that could be perceived as negative may cause the teacher to become flustered and deliver an ineffective lesson. That is not the goal of an observation. “The ultimate goal of teacher evaluation systems is to improve the quality of instruction by clarifying expectations for effective teaching and helping teachers meet those expectations through high quality feedback and support, (Reform Support Network, 2015).” Finally, the most important part of the evaluation process is the post-observation conference. This is an opportunity for the instructional leader and the teacher to discuss the varying aspects of the observation, e.g.; what went right, what did not go as planned, what improvements can be made, etc. This is also the time for the administrator to provide both positive and constructive feedback on what was seen during the classroom visit. Without this crucial feedback, educators are unable to grow as professionals because they will have no idea on what is the right path forward.
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2 Benchmark: Leading Leaders in Giving Peer Feedback related to Teacher Performance How did the instructional leader establish rapport with the teacher? To begin the pre-observation conferences for both teachers, the administrator established rapport with the teachers by asking general questions regarding their lives outside of school. For example, the instructional leader asked one of the teachers how her master’s program was going.
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  • Fall '17
  • Joan Hudson
  • Week 6, administrator, teachers’ performance

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