Meta-Ethics.pdf - Meta-Ethics 1 Meta-Ethics PHI 2600 Morality versus Ethics Morality is NOT the same thing as ethics Morality derives from the Latin

Meta-Ethics.pdf - Meta-Ethics 1 Meta-Ethics PHI 2600...

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Meta-Ethics 1 Meta-Ethics PHI 2600 Morality versus Ethics Morality is NOT the same thing as ethics! Morality derives from the Latin, morés , meaning “custom.” It implies conformity to conventional sanctioned codes or accepted notions of right and wrong. Yet, morality may not entail the complexities of “rightness,” fairness,” or “equity.” The term “morality” may be sometimes used either descriptively or normatively . When used descriptively it may refer to a code of conduct put forward by a society, some other group (such a s a religious group), or one’s individual code. When used normatively it refers to a code of conduct that, given specified conditions, would be put forward by all rational persons, e.g., natural law. Morality Can be Seen in Three Ways: 1. Conventional morality 2. Legality or Legal morality 3. Religious morality Morality versus Ethics Essentially, morality is tied to culture, tied to specific rules and laws; however, ethics both comprises and studies the principles the foundations of morality. Ethics (construed as singular) transcends social conventions, legal statutes/decrees, and religious dogma. Another Way of Looking at Ethics Ethics derives from the Greek, ethos , meaning “character.” Ethics is the study of morality, the motivations for moral behavior, the nature of moral propositions, the status of moral relationships and obligations. Ethics also implies a particular system of principles and rules (whether true or not) concerning duty, i.e., the study of human duty and/or the body of rules of duty drawn from this study. The Source of Morality …? The source and standard of morality is the crux of many debates. The main difference between meta-ethical views (especially moral relativists and ethical objectivists) rests on the disagreement concerning the possibility of moral beliefs ever becoming true or ever being proven to be true.
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