Fulani Culture.docx - My family is undoubtedly part of one...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 5 pages.

My family is undoubtedly part of one of the best known ethnic groups in Africa and certainly the most spread out through Africa. our ethnic group represent a significant percentage of the population in the following countries: Mauritania, Senegal, Mali, Chad, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, called in many ways: The Fulani, the Fula, Fulani, the Pulaars the Haal-Pulars .... but the language remains the same and customs are unchanged from the ancestors. My family lives in the remote village “Gaya” located in the north west of Dakar the capital of Senegal and about 200 kilometers away from the nearest city. Conservative in the soul my family’s culture is as diverse as vary. We strictly follow a family code which is an essence that define you. As a member of the family You are responsible to carry out and hand out the values from generation to generation. This code of conduct consists of the qualities of patience, self- control, discipline, prudence, modesty respect for others (including foes), wisdom, forethought, personal responsibility hospitality courage and hard work these are cardinal values that every Fulani including myself should embodies and live with it. Orthodox Muslims or members Tidjane brotherhood, our traditional activity is farming. But over the years, with climate change and the population explosion forced the community to exercise other professions: hairdresser, taxi driver and small merchant emigration. The typical Fulani is usually small size, light complexion and fine features. The legends concerning the origin of the Fulani are numerous. They say for example that they would come from Ethiopia or Egypt! We have numerous similarities with the Maasai warriors from Kenya. Nomadic and pastoralist traders for the most part. My folks to this day herd cattle, goats and sheep across the vast hinterland of their domain. Keeping somewhat separate from the local agricultural populations. Like most pastoral Fulani, my family have maintained a way of life in many regards close to the life cycle of the cattle. To my parents, cattle are not just a herd of animals, but also a source of life, a sign of wealth, and a mark of social status. Maintaining a large amount of this precious asset is therefore not only a daily occupation, but also a way of perpetuating blessing within the family and clan. This is perhaps why some argued that the typical Fulani does not live with his cattle, he lives for them; he does not lead his cattle, he follows them; he does not like his cattle, he loves them. In fact, in addition to his utilitarian perception of the procreative multiplication of his animals as the growth of material wealth, the Fulani views the same phenomenon as a materialization of blessing whose attributes encompass more than material satisfaction. From my parent perspective, cattle bond has evolved to a distinct
spiritual conception of life hardly imaginable for the American rancher in whose

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture