Pride in R&J - The Power of Pride in Romeo and Juliet By Arsh Chopra In Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet the theme of pride is displayed

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The Power of Pride in Romeo and Juliet By Arsh Chopra In Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet the theme of pride is displayed throughout the play with Romeo going to the Capulet party, Capulet’s enraged disownment of Juliet after her refusal to marry Paris, and Juliet’s threat to Friar Lawrence to kill herself after Capulet’s outrage. The characters are all blinded by their own pride in doing what they wanted rather than using their common sense to make the best decision possible. Their boldness prevented them from seeing any other options. Romeo is heartbroken by Rosaline’s rejection and his own stubbornness willed him to take the risk of going to his enemy Capulet’s party to pursue her. Romeo exposed his intention to go to the party when he said: “I’ll go along, no such sight to be shown/ But to rejoice in splendor of mine own” (I, iii, 107-108). As Romeo says these words he is implying his plan of going to the party and wearing a mask to keep hidden. Also, rather than looking for a new girl, he is going to try to win back Rosaline. Romeo’s
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course ENGL 202D taught by Professor Crimmins,kemdavi during the Fall '07 term at Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

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Pride in R&J - The Power of Pride in Romeo and Juliet By Arsh Chopra In Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet the theme of pride is displayed

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