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Unformatted text preview: Rice University Center for College Readiness Advanced Placement Summer Institute Pre-AP English for New Teachers July 21 - 24, 2015 Jerry Brown [email protected] website: jerrywbrown.com Pre-AP English High School APSI 2015 Table of Contents CollegeBoard AP Central Overview Pre-AP "All In" Campaign AP English Language and Composition AP English Language Course Resources AP English Literature and Composition AP English Literature Course Resources "Why AP Matters" Newsweek Multiple Choice Instructions Levels of Reading and Questioning the Text English II - Pre-AP Skills Chart AP English Language Multiple Choice AP Multiple Choice Test Taking Strategies Multiple Choice Stems AP English Language Tests Types of Multiple Choice Stems Language Tests Rhetorical Terms from Released Language Tests Essential Rhetorical Strategies (Werkenthin) AP Literature Multiple Choice 1982 - Exam Stems 1987 - Exam Stems 1991 - Exam Stems 1994 - Exam Stems 1999 - Exam Stems 2004 - Exam Stems 2009 - Exam Stems Poetry and Prose used in released exams Frequency of instructional words used in stems Frequency of terms used in released exams Vocabulary used in released exams Types of questions in Literature MC Exams Project your score BAT the prompt How to Read “Difficult Texts” Synthesis Prompts Example of Marked Synthesis Prompt Synthesis Question 2012 (USPS) Scoring Guide - Synthesis - 2012 Student Samples - Synthesis - 2012 Examining Sample paragraphs from 8s and 9s Introduction to Argumentation Writing Rhetorical Analysis Paragraphs and Essays Question 1 (1992) Queen Elizabeth I Speech Question 3 (1992) “Cripple” article Writing the Persuasive Essay (Werkenthin) "They say. I say" Templates Additional rhetorical/argument templates Using Transitions Effectively Argument Question 2012 Scoring Guide - Argument Question 2012 Student Samples - Argument - 2012 AP Language Prompts 1981 - 2014 AP Language Frequency Chart 1981 - 2003 Poetry Question 2012 Scoring Guide - Poetry - 2012 Student Samples - Poetry - 2012 1 2 3 5 7 9 11 14 17 18 21 36 38 43 45 46 47 49 51 53 55 57 59 61 62 64 69 72 73 74 76 78 83 84 92 93 98 110 111 120 125 129 132 138 142 146 147 148 153 160 162 163 164 Prose Question 2012 Scoring Guide - Prose Question 2012 Student Samples - Prose Questions 2012 Open Question 2012 Scoring Guide - Open - AP Literature 2012 Student Samples - Open - AP Literature 2012 There Will Come Soft Rains - Ray Bradbury The Bridge of Khazad-dûm - Tolkien The Mirror of Galadriel - Tolkien Model essay opening paragraphs Tolkien essay assignment and scoring scale Oedipus the King (Abridged and Adapted) Writing Tasks for Oedipus the King Likert Scale - Oedipus Themes Questions to Consider while viewing Antigone Antigone and Ismeme Opening Argument Haemon and Creon Argument Tempest in the Lunchroom Fooling with Words New Year’s Day by Coleman Barks Jars of Springwater translated by Coleman Barks Where Everything is Music translated by Barks oh absalom my son my son by Lucille Clifton Golden Retrievals by Mark Doty Messiah (Christmas Portions) by Mark Doty Brian Age Seven by Mark Doty The Envoy by Jane Hirshfield Symposium by Paul Muldoon Halley’s Comet by Stanley Kunitz The Clasp by Sharon Olds To Television by Robert Pinsky I Chop Some Parsley by Billy Collins Because My Students Asked Me by Taylor Mali SATIRE Satire (Comedy) - AP Literature Examples SHORT STORIES Long Walk to Forever - Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. Mrs. McWilliams and the Lightning - Mark Twain Tom Edison's Shaggy Dog - Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. The Story of the Bad Little Boy - Mark Twain The Story of the Good Little Boy - Mark Twain "The Philosophy of Composition" - Edgar Allan Poe The Tell-Tale Heart - Edgar Allan Poe - analysis lesson Murder He Wrote - How People Die in Poe's Stories Sonnet - To Science - Poe (analysis) Question 2 (1994) Poe's To Helen Student Samples - 9s Opening to The Fall of the House of Usher - Poe The Conqueror Worm - Poe - analysis on your own ending to The Premature Burial - analysis essay 169 170 171 176 177 178 183 187 191 197 198 199 211 213 214 216 219 223 225 225 226 227 227 228 230 231 232 232 233 234 235 236 237 255 261 266 270 272 275 277 284 285 288 288 291 292 294 Jerry W. Brown [email protected] Rice 2015 1 AP Central - Pre-AP Close Pre-AP Preparing Every Student for College Pre-AP is based on the following two important premises. The first is the expectation that all students can perform well at rigorous academic levels. This expectation should be reflected in curriculum and instruction throughout the school such that all students are consistently being challenged to expand their knowledge and skills to the next level. The second important premise of Pre-AP is the belief that we can prepare every student for higher intellectual engagement by starting the development of skills and acquisition of knowledge as early as possible. Addressed effectively, the middle and high school years can provide a powerful opportunity to help all students acquire the knowledge, concepts, and skills needed to engage in a higher level of learning. The College Board supports Pre-AP programs in schools and districts in the following ways: Pre-AP Professional Development The College Board offers a suite of Pre-AP professional development resources and services designed to equip all middle and high school teachers with the strategies and tools they need to engage their students in active, high-level learning, thereby ensuring that every middle and high school student develops the skills, habits of mind, and concepts they need to succeed in college. Pre-AP Initiatives is a key component of the College Board's® K-12 Professional Development unit. Since Pre-AP teacher professional development supports explicitly the goal of college as an option for every student, it is important to have a recognized standard for college-level academic work. The Advanced Placement Program provides these standards for Pre-AP. Pre-AP teacher professional development resources reflect topics, concepts,Copyright and skills found in AP © 2015 collegeboard.com, Inc. courses. Below are links to the Professional Development area of the College Board's web site for professionals. Each subject area includes descriptions of AP and Pre-AP workshops. To schedule a Pre-AP workshop, contact your district representative or email [email protected] for further assistance. Workshops & Summer Institutes, English Workshops & Summer Institutes, Fine Arts Workshops & Summer Institutes, Mathematics and Computer Science Workshops & Summer Institutes, Sciences Workshops & Summer Institutes, Social Sciences and History Workshops & Summer Institutes, World Languages Workshops & Summer Institutes, Interdisciplinary Workshops & Summer Institutes, K-12 Administrators* * See this area for Setting the Cornerstones and Instructional Leadership workshops. You may also search for a Pre-AP workshop or summer institute near you with AP Central's Institutes & Workshops search. Institutes & Workshops SpringBoard® Pre-AP Program SpringBoard is the College Board's official Pre-AP program in English language arts and mathematics for grades six - 12, and is based on the belief that every student deserves access to rigorous coursework that leads to success in AP and college. Written by teachers for teachers and aligned to the Common Core State Standards, SpringBoard integrates high-quality professional development for teachers and administrators with formative assessments and rigorous instructional materials to offer a complete college readiness solution. Visit SpringBoard for details. 4/26/2015 12:29 PM Jerry W. Brown [email protected] Dear Members, Development is under way on the College Board's new "All In" campaign, a coordinated effort between the College Board and its members to dramatically increase the number of African American, Latino, and Native American students with AP® potential who enroll in AP classes. When we say "All In," we mean it. We want 100 percent of students who have demonstrated the potential to be successful in AP to take at least one AP course. Performance on the PSAT/NMSQT® is a strong predictor of success in AP classes, and despite significant progress, African American, Latino, and Native American students who show AP potential through the PSAT/NMSQT still enroll in AP classes at a rate far below those of white and Asian students. You and your colleagues have been and will continue to be the leaders of this work. As we design All In, we want to align with your day-to-day efforts to improve student achievement. Amy Wilkins, the College Board's senior fellow for social justice, is leading the All In campaign, and she needs your help. Please take a few minutes to send an email to Amy at [email protected] detailing strategies for expanding access to AP, particularly for high-achieving African American, Latino, and Native American students. We look forward to working with you. Sincerely, David Rice 2015 2 Jerry W. Brown [email protected] Rice 2015 3 A P ® E nglish lAng uAgE About the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®) The Advanced Placement Program® enables willing and academically prepared students to pursue college-level studies — with the opportunity to earn college credit, advanced placement, or both — while still in high school. AP Exams are given each year in May. Students who earn a qualifying score on an AP Exam are typically eligible to receive college credit and/or placement into advanced courses in college. Every aspect of AP course and exam development is the result of collaboration between AP teachers and college faculty. They work together to develop AP courses and exams, set scoring standards, and score the exams. College faculty review every AP teacher’s course syllabus. AP English Program The AP Program offers two courses in English studies, each designed to provide high school students the opportunity to engage with a typical introductory-level college English curriculum. The AP English Language and Composition course focuses on the development and revision of evidence-based analytic and argumentative writing and the rhetorical analysis of nonfiction texts. The AP English Literature and Composition course focuses on reading, analyzing, and writing about imaginative literature (fiction, poetry, drama) from various periods. There is no prescribed sequence of study, and a school may offer one or both courses. AP English Language and Composition Course Overview The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods. PrErEquisitE AP English Language and Composition Course Content The AP English Language and Composition course is designed to help students become skilled readers and writers through engagement with the following course requirements: • Composing in several forms (e.g., narrative, expository, analytical, and argumentative essays) about a variety of subjects • Writing that proceeds through several stages or drafts, with revision aided by teacher and peers • Writing informally (e.g., imitation exercises, journal keeping, collaborative writing), which helps students become aware of themselves as writers and the techniques employed by other writers • Writing expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions based on readings representing a variety of prose styles and genres • Reading nonfiction (e.g., essays, journalism, science writing, autobiographies, criticism) selected to give students opportunities to identify and explain an author’s use of rhetorical strategies and techniques1 • Analyzing graphics and visual images both in relation to written texts and as alternative forms of text themselves • Developing research skills and the ability to evaluate, use, and cite primary and secondary sources • Conducting research and writing argument papers in which students present an argument of their own that includes the analysis and synthesis of ideas from an array of sources There are no prerequisite courses for AP English Language and Composition. • Citing sources using a recognized editorial style (e.g., Modern Language Association, The Chicago Manual of Style) Students should be able to read and comprehend college-level texts and apply the conventions of Standard Written English in their writing. • Revising their work to develop o A wide-ranging vocabulary used appropriately and effectively; o A variety of sentence structures, including appropriate use of subordination and coordination; o Logical organization, enhanced by techniques such as repetition, transitions, and emphasis; o A balance of generalization and specific, illustrative detail; and o An effective use of rhetoric, including tone, voice, diction, and sentence structure. 1. The College Board does not mandate any particular authors or reading list, but representative authors are cited in the AP English Language Course Description. Jerry W. Brown [email protected] Rice 2015 4 AP English Language and Composition Exam structure AP English lAnguAgE And ComPosition ExAm: 3 hours 15 minutEs Format of Assessment Assessment Overview section i: Multiple Choice: 52–55 Questions | 60 Minutes | 45% of Exam Score The AP English Language and Composition Exam employs multiple-choice questions to test students’ skills in rhetorical analysis of prose passages. Students are also required to write three essays that demonstrate their skill in rhetorical analysis, argumentation, and synthesis of information from multiple sources to support the student’s own argument. Although the skills tested on the exam remain essentially the same from year to year, there may be some variation in format of the free-response (essay) questions. • Includes excerpts from several non-fiction texts • Each excerpt is accompanied by several multiple-choice questions section ii: Free Response: 3 Prompts | 2 Hours 15 Minutes | 55% of Exam Score • 15 minutes for reading source materials for the synthesis prompt (in the free-response section) • 120 minutes to write essay responses to the three free-response prompts Prompt types Synthesis: Students read several texts about a topic and create an argument that synthesizes at least three of the sources to support their thesis. Rhetorical Analysis: Students read a non-fiction text and analyze how the writer’s language choices contribute to his or her purpose and intended meaning for the text. Argument: Students create an evidence-based argument that responds to a given topic. AP EngLish LAnguAgE And COmPOsitiOn sAmPLE ExAm quEstiOns sample multiple-Choice question Students are given a passage of writing and asked to respond to a set of prompts and questions based on the passage. Below is one example. The primary rhetorical function of lines 14–22 is to (A) provide support for a thesis supplied in lines 1–2 (B) provide evidence to contrast with that supplied in the first paragraph (C) present a thesis that will be challenged in paragraph three (D) introduce a series of generalizations that are supported in the last two paragraphs (E) anticipate objections raised by the ideas presented in lines 12–14 sample Free-response question The following passage is from Rights of Man, a book written by the pamphleteer Thomas Paine in 1791. Born in England, Paine was an intellectual, a revolutionary, and a supporter of American independence from England. Read the passage carefully. Then write an essay that examines the extent to which Paine’s characterization of America holds true today. Use appropriate evidence to support your argument. If there is a country in the world, where concord, according to common calculation, would be least expected, it is America. Made up, as it is, of people from different nations, accustomed to different forms and habits of government, speaking different languages, and more different in their modes of worship, it would appear that the union of such a people was impracticable; but by the simple operation of constructing government on the principles of society and the rights of man, every difficulty retires, and all the parts are brought into cordial unison. There, the poor are not oppressed, the rich are not privileged.... Their taxes are few, because their government is just; and as there is nothing to render them wretched, there is nothing to engender riots and tumults. Educators: apcentral.collegeboard.org/apenglishlanguage Students: apstudent.collegeboard.org/apenglishlanguage © 2014 The College Board. 13b-7589 (Updated June 2014) Jerry W. Brown [email protected] Rice 2015 5 Essential AP Language and Composition Course Resources "College Board." AP Central. Web. 26 Apr. 2015. < ;. • • AP English Language and Composition Course Description Course Overview (.pdf/1.29MB) | Full Course Description (.pdf/2.01MB) AP English Language Teacher's Guide (.pdf/1.0MB) Other Core Resources • • • AP English Language and Composition Frequently Asked Questions AP English Language and Composition Development Committee AP English Language and Composition Course Perspective AP Exam Information and Resources • • • • • • • AP English Language and Composition Exam Information Free AP English Language and Composition Practice Exam The AP English Language Exam: Developing an Argument Shaping Argument: Lessons from 2003 Exam Samples The Question of the Question AP English Language Exam Tips Multiple Choice Section Scoring Change AP Course Audit Information • Syllabus Development Guide, Sample Syllabi, and more Classroom Resources • From the College Board • Curriculum Modules The Rhetoric of Monuments and Memorials (.pdf/2.4MB) Using Documentary Film as an Introduction to Rhetoric (.pdf/314KB) o Special Focus Materials Reading and Writing Analytically (.pdf/1.3MB) Using Sources (.pdf/5.0MB) Writing Persuasively (.pdf/593KB) From Your AP Colleagues o o Pedagogy Entering the Synthesis Conversation: Starting with What We're Already Doing Teaching Nonfiction Books in AP English Language and Composition Jerry W. Brown [email protected] Rice 2015 6 Conferences With Student Writers Persona in Autobiography A Wealth of Arguments: Using Science Writing in AP English Language and Composition Synthesis and the DBQ Blending AP English Language and Composition and American Literature Nonfiction at Heart: AP English Language and Composition On Your Mark: AP English Language and Composition Lazy Cheaters and Other Misnomers: Part I Lazy Cheaters and Other Misnomers: Part II Significance, Consequence, or Reason: Creating Meaningful Thesis Statements But This Book Has Pictures! The Case for Graphic Novels in an AP Classroom Reading Images: An Approach and a Demonstration Adapting Literature Circles: A Study of "Reason" What Do Students Need to Know About Rhetoric? (.pdf/119KB) Course Content — Related Articles AP English -- Dispelling the Myth The World Is Their Subject: AP English Language The Rhetoric of Advertising Getting a Handle on Handbooks Meditations on The Elements of Style A Strong Foundation, or Why Is Teaching English Important to You? Web Guides AP English Language and Composition Web Guide Grammar Web Guide Pre-AP Strategies Pre-AP Lesson Plan: Building a Toolbox for Rhetorical Analysis SOAPSTone: A Strategy for Reading and Writing Reviews of Teaching Resources o o o o There are currently more than 250 reviews of teaching resources, including textbooks, Web sites, software, and more, in the Teachers' Resources area. Each review describes the resource and...
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