Task_3_Organizational_Systems_and_Quality_Leadership.docx - Running head ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS AND QUALITY LEADERSHIP Organizational Systems and

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Running head: ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS AND QUALITY LEADERSHIP 1 Organizational Systems and Quality Leadership Laurie Driggers Task 3, SAT1-0517/1217 02/13/2019 Western Governors University
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ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS AND QUALITY LEADERSHIP 2 Organizational Systems and Quality Leadership A1. Country to Compare My Daughter and her husband currently live in Okinawa, Japan, so I will compare Japan’s healthcare system to that of the United States. A2. Access Japan’s healthcare system is a universal coverage that is funded by the government for children, the unemployed, and retirees. All residents of Japan are covered, and premiums are based on income and the ability to pay. “Health insurance expenditures are financed by payroll taxes paid by employees and employers and by income-based premiums paid by the self- employed” (Rodwin, pg.7, 1994). These healthcare plans are composed of Government-managed plans (30%), Society-managed plans (10%), and Plans for day laborers, those who work less than two months a year (0.1% and 0.4%). These health insurance benefits are designed to provide basic medical care to the largest number of people. Copays are subsidized by the government. Extra fees are prohibited. There are no out of pocket expenses (Matsuda, n.d.). The unemployed and the retired have the same accesses to healthcare regardless if they are unable to pay (Rodwin, 1994). The Japanese can also choose their healthcare providers without stipulations. They are covered regardless of their medical conditions or risk of illness in the future. Control of healthcare is left to the medical professionals. Japan has a number one ranking in health status as well as lower cost of medical care than other wealthy industrialized nations (Rodwin, 1994). The Japanese also visit the doctor 14 times a year which is 3 times more than the average developed country (Henke, Kadonaga, & Kanzler, 2009). Japan and the United States have multi-payer systems, but that is where the similarity ends. In the US at least 10% of Americans are uninsured, even though the Affordable Care Act
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ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS AND QUALITY LEADERSHIP 3 was passed to insure medical coverage. Coverage is provided by independent healthcare insurances like BCBS, government insurance such as Medicaid and Medicare, and then those who are uninsured are either self-pay or leave the cost to be covered by the hospital or facility in which they received care. Those who work can be covered by their employee at a cost if offered. Employees pay part and employers pay part. Access to medical care is simple yet with some insurance requirements include a gatekeeper who is in control of whom a patient can see for healthcare. This is normally the primary care physician who can refer a patient to other doctors or specialists. Other insurance companies allow the customer to choose a doctor within a hospital
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