Class Stratification in the United States

Class Stratification in the United States - Class...

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Class Stratification in the United States (Some information is from Social Inequality by Marger, 1999) 1. General comments and notes: The U.S. class stratification system functions within a world stratification system, which we’ve discussed in class; within that world system, the U.S. is one of the richest countries in the world, in income per capita, as well as wealth, but also in other indicators, such as educational attainment. One question in discussing economic inequality in the U.S. is “who gets what?” Power (and differences in power) underlies all of our discussions of inequality, whether economic or racial or social or otherwise. There is an ideology that perpetuates social and economic inequalities, as well as structured institutions. That ideology in the U.S. includes individualism and meritocracy. Social inequality is evident in all societies – some groups get more of society’s valued resources than others. Sociologists who take a functionalist perspective differ in their explanations of inequality than those who take a conflict perspective, but all agree that some inequalities are inevitable. Most Americans are aware of class in the U.S., but they have little
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course SOCI 101 taught by Professor Shanahan during the Fall '08 term at UNC.

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Class Stratification in the United States - Class...

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