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Immigration Policy Thesis and Outline 1 Immigration Policy Thesis and Outline STUDENT NAME SOC 320: Public Policy Instructor Ashley Colby December 11, 2017
Immigration Policy Thesis and Outline 2 The U.S.’s Immigration Policy is a controversial topic. There are many who disagree with the policy and believe that immigrants should not be allowed to live and work in the U.S. while many support it. The current immigration policy allows 675,000 permanent immigrants each year to legally enter the U.S. This policy allows foreign nationals to enter the U.S. and permanently work and reside in the country (“How the United States Immigration System Works”, 2017). The U.S. should keep the current immigration policy and continue to allow foreign nationals to enter the country to legally work/reside here because it allows the reunification of families, protects refugees, promotes diversity, and admits immigrants with skills that are valuable to the economy. Up until 1875, immigration was the responsibility of the states, but when the Supreme Court ruled in Chy Lung v. Freeman, immigration became a federal responsibility. In 1891, the Immigration Act was established giving the federal government authority over immigration. The Immigration Acts of 1921 and 1924 established quota-based systems for immigration which limited the number of immigrants based on national origins, which Former President Woodrow Wilson began by limiting the amount of Europeans allowed to enter the country (Allerfeldt, 2007, p145). Later, the national origin quotas were repealed and the preference of family reunification and allowing those with desirable skills systems enter the country were established with the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, with the U.S. Refugee Act follwoing in 1980. (Theodoulou & Kofinis, 2012, chap 12.3). The act that has since been the largest problem with the immigration policy is the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 which provides amnesty for illegal aliens. The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 provided amnesty for illegal aliens was one of the ways that the immigration policy issue came to public and political awareness and
Immigration Policy Thesis and Outline 3 caused backlash, although it was established in hopes to restore control over undocumented immigration (Baker, 1997, p5). In 1996, the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act imposed social benefit restrictions for illegal aliens as well as placed an emphasis on border patrol. In hopes to rectify the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, the USA Patriot Act of 2000 allowed the detainment of captured illegal aliens for up to six months if individuals were deemed to pose a national security risk. In 2002, the Homeland

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