Complementary_Therapy_Use_in_Persons_wit.pdf - JOURNAL...

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JOURNAL OF HOLISTIC NURSING / September 2002Kirksey et al. / COMPLEMENTARY THERAPY USEComplementary Therapy Usein Persons With HIV/AIDSKenn M. Kirksey, Ph.D., A.P.R.N., B.C.California State University, FresnoBrian K. Goodroad, Ph.D.(c), R.N., A.N.P., A.C.R.N.Metropolitan State University, St. PaulJeanne K. Kemppainen, Ph.D., R.N.Veteran’s Administration Palo Alto Health Care SystemWilliam L. Holzemer, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N.University of California, San FranciscoEli Haugen Bunch, D.N.Sc., R.N.University of OsloInge B. Corless, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N.Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions, BostonLucille Sanzero Eller, Ph.D., R.N.Rutgers UniversityPatrice Kenneally Nicholas, D.N.Sc., M.P.H., R.N.Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions, BostonKathleen Nokes, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N.Hunter CollegeCatherine Bain, M.S., R.N.University of California, San FranciscoThe purpose of this study was to describe the frequency and correlates of complemen-tary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies used by people with HIV/AIDS tomanage illness and treatment-related symptoms. Data were collected from a conve-nience sample (N= 422) of people living with HIV disease. Demographic variables264JOURNAL OF HOLISTIC NURSING, Vol. 20 No. 3, September 2002264-278© 2002 American Holistic Nurses’ Association
(e.g., education, age, and gender) were compared for those who reported using at leastone CAM therapy. There were significant differences for gender (χ2= 4.003,df= 1,p= .045) and for ethnicity (χ2= 6.042,df= 2,p= .049). Females and African Ameri-cans used CAM more frequently. More than one third of the participants used CAM,and there were a total of 246 critical incidents of nontraditional treatment use. It ispossible that these nonallopathic interventions may positively affect health-relatedquality of life in persons with HIV by ameliorating or reducing the side effects associ-ated with the disease and its treatments.The literature is repletewith citations noting significant reductionsin morbidity and mortality rates among people with HIV/AIDS sincethe advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (Holzemer et al.,2000; Kirksey, Hamilton, Holzemer, Hudson, & Holt-Ashley, 2001).There have been decreases in viral load to undetectable levels,increased CD4+cell counts, and prevention of some opportunisticinfections. HIV disease is now considered to be a chronic illness.Although the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy has resultedin increased longevity, it has also necessitated the development oftreatment options for managing illness-associated and treatment-related side effects (Newshan & Sherman, 1999). Holzemer and col-leagues (2000) noted that symptom management for people withHIV/AIDS is recognized as an extremely important component ofcare management.

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