Race_Ethnicity_and_Women_s_Use_of_Comple.pdf - RESEARCH AND...

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American Journal of Public Health|July 2006, Vol 96, No. 71236|Research and Practice|Peer Reviewed|Kronenberg et al.RESEARCH AND PRACTICEObjectives.We studied the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) among women in 4 racial/ethnic groups: non-Hispanic Whites, AfricanAmericans, Mexican Americans, and Chinese Americans.Methods.We obtained a nationally representative sample of women aged 18years and older living in the United States in 2001. Oversampling obtained 800interviews in each group, resulting in a sample of 3068 women.Results.Between one third and one half of the members of all groups reportedusing at least 1 CAM modality in the year preceding the survey. In bivariate analy-ses, overall CAM use among Whites surpassed that of other groups; however,when CAM use was adjusted for socioeconomic factors, use by Whites andMexican Americans were equivalent. Despite the socioeconomic disadvantage ofAfrican American women, socioeconomic factors did not account for differencesin CAM use between Whites and African Americans.Conclusions.CAM use among racial/ethnic groups is complex and nuanced. Pat-terns of CAM use domains differ among groups, and multivariate models of CAMuse indicate that ethnicity plays an independent role in the use of CAM modali-ties, the use of CAM practitioners, and the health problems for which CAM isused. (Am J Public Health.2006;96:1236–1242. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2004.047688)Race/Ethnicity and Women’s Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the United States: Results of a National Survey|Fredi Kronenberg, PhD, Linda F. Cushman, PhD, Christine M. Wade, MPH, Debra Kalmuss, PhD, and Maria T. Chao, DrPHeffects, then access to CAM services shouldnot be limited by race or ethnicity.Our study extended prior work by examin-ing patterns of CAM use among women in 4racial/ethnic groups: non-Hispanic Whites,African Americans, Mexican Americans, andChinese Americans. On the basis of nationaldata, we assessed differences in the use ofCAM overall, of CAM practitioners, of specificCAM domains, and the most common healthconditions for which CAM was used.METHODSStudy DesignA cross-sectional telephone survey ofwomen aged 18 years and older living in theUnited States provided nationally representa-tive data on women’s use of CAM within theyear before the summer of 2001, as well ason women in 3 minority groups. We exam-ined women who self-identified as non-His-panic White, African American, MexicanAmerican, and Chinese American. The latter2 groups were targeted because they are thelargest Latino and Asian populations livingin the United States. Interviews were con-ducted in English, Spanish, Mandarin, andCantonese.SampleSampling and computer-assisted telephoneinterviews were conducted by a nationallyrecognized survey research firm. They usedthe GENESYS random-digit dialing samplingsystem (GENESYS Telecommunications Lab-oratories, Daly City, Calif) to generate a na-tionally representative sample of telephonehouseholds with English-speaking women re-siding in the continental United States. The

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