Medical_Pluralism_of_Chinese_Women_Livin - J Immigrant Minority Health(2007 9:255\u2013267 DOI 10.1007\/s10903-007-9038-x ORIGINAL PAPER Medical

Medical_Pluralism_of_Chinese_Women_Livin - J Immigrant...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 13 pages.

ORIGINAL PAPER Medical Pluralism of Chinese Women Living in the United States Christine Wade Æ Maria T. Chao Æ Fredi Kronenberg Published online: 13 March 2007 Ó Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007 Abstract This study provides national prevalence estimates for complementary and alternative (CAM) use, visits to doctors for health problems, and the effects of acculturation on health practices in Chinese women living in the United States. A national telephone survey of 3,172 women on their use of complementary and alternative medicine was conducted in 2001. This study focuses on a subsample of 804 Chinese-American women who were asked about health practices and service utilization. Interviews were conducted in Mandarin, Cantonese and English. Forty-one percent of Chinese- American women used some form of CAM in 2001. Socio-economic status, a common predictor of CAM use in other studies of the general population in the United States, did not predict use in this sample. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is used across acculturation levels. As Chinese women adapt to American culture they tend to use a greater variety of healthcare practices and to adopt mainstream CAM practices, but they also continue to use TCM. Keywords Traditional Chinese Medicine Á Minority and immigrant health Á Chinese-Americans Á Complementary and alternative medicine Á Acculturation Introduction The majority (71%) of Chinese living in the United States were not born here [ 1 ]. After Mexicans, Chinese from the People’s Republic, Hong Kong, and Taiwan constitute the largest group of foreign born in the United States [ 1 ]. Migration and resettlement have health consequences. Health service utilization also changes as the immigrant adapts to the host culture, seeking available care for pat- terns and types of illness that may be different from those of relatives left behind [ 2 , 3 ]. Most Chinese immigrants in the U.S. have had access to both Western 1 and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) in their countries of origin [ 4 , 5 ]. While simultaneous or serial treatment from multiple medical systems is not unique to the Chinese, describing the health profile of Chinese-Americans requires under- standing the contingencies of migration and study of transitional phenomena, as well as the norms of health care both in the originating culture and in the United States. Medical Pluralism in the United States Americans use a variety of health care [ 6 10 ], but the medical pluralism in the United States is not well described. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is usually measured by asking about the use of a list of heterogenous therapies, which are not thought to be part of conventional medicine [ 11 ]. The relative terminology used to distinguish conventional medical therapies from those that are not is problematic, prompting researchers to propose a descriptive taxomony that distinguishes between therapies popular in the mainstream culture and more culture-bound practices confined to narrow groups, such as C. Wade ( & ) Á M. T. Chao Á F. Kronenberg

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture