Neanderthals - Homo neanderthalensis Homo neanderthalensis...

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Homo neanderthalensis Homo neanderthalensis is perhaps one of the most well-known hominids ever discovered. More commonly referred to as Neanderthals, these unique bipeds have been studied time and time again in an attempt to reveal their cultural behavior and ultimately discover what actually happened to these exceptional creatures. As the closest relative to modern humans, the study of Neanderthals is a key factor in the development of human evolution. According to Jurmain and his colleagues, Neanderthals are believed to have lived in Europe and later on branched off into western Asia, with remains dating back as far as 300,000 years (p. 341). However, the first discovery was at the Neander Valley in Germany in 1856 (Jurmain, Kilgore, Trevathan p. 344). Some workmen discovered the bones, which they thought were the remains of a cave bear so they were given to a natural science teacher, who recognized that they were from an ancient human (Jurmain et al p. 344). This event sparked the beginning of many other excavations in search of this new hominid. The majority of Neanderthal fossils were found in Europe and date back 75,000 to
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Neanderthals - Homo neanderthalensis Homo neanderthalensis...

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