Walden Week 10 Final Project EBP.docx

Walden Week 10 Final Project EBP.docx - COURSE PROJECT PART...

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COURSE PROJECT: PART 3 – TRANSLATING EVIDENCE INTO PRACTICE Translating Evidence Into Practice Kendall Beerer NURS 6052N-30: Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice Walden University May 5, 2019
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COURSE PROJECT: PART 3 – TRANSLATING EVIDENCE INTO PRACTICE Translating Evidence Into Practice Take a minute to stand in the middle of an emergency department or intensive care unit, and just listen and observe. How many alarms do you hear? Can you differentiate the type of alarm, or where it is coming from? A frequently concerning phenomenon known as “alarm fatigue” has plagued acute care settings for years. According to Sendelbach and Funk (2013), “Alarm fatigue is sensory overload when clinicians are exposed to an excessive number of alarms, which can result in desensitization to alarms and missed alarms” (para. 1). In order to address this particular issue, formulating a question and generating a study design produces research that can hold significant value in providing understanding and implications for change regarding this topic. Therefore, evidence-based practice connects research findings applicable to practice, and defines appropriate and necessary clinical practices and procedures. Evidence-based practice allows for identification and support of certain practices, methods, procedures, and processes. In order to improve patient outcomes, research is conducted to establish a specified result. The research utilization/innovation diffusion process begins with an empirically based innovation or new idea that gets scrutinized for possible adoption in practice settings. Evidence-based practice, by contrast, begins with a search for information about how best to solve specific practice problems (Polit & Beck, 2017). Consequently, in order to better understand a topic, examining current literature is an important part of the process. The purpose of this project is to identify alarm fatigue as a researchable problem and explain the significance of this problem; synthesize studies that identify the frequency of alarm fatigue, the common causes of unnecessary alarms, ideal alarm 2
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COURSE PROJECT: PART 3 – TRANSLATING EVIDENCE INTO PRACTICE management, and the interventions needed to address alarm fatigue; summarize findings from the literature review that describes a nursing practice supported by the evidence; and explain contributing factors necessary to translate the evidence into practice. Organizational Problem Acute care settings are overwhelmed with noise, volume, device sounds, and alarms that are afflicting today’s nurses and risking patient safety. McGinley and Pelczarski (2013) offer a related proposal, and challenge those involved in these settings by asking: “How many alarms do you hear? Can you distinguish where each alarm is coming from and whether it’s a physiologic monitor or ventilator or infusion pump alarm? Does each alarm connote the level of urgency needed for the nurse to respond promptly and appropriately?” By subjecting individuals to take a minute and just listen, most would be shocked what they would hear.
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  • Fall '16
  • Nursing, Evidence-based medicine, Paine, Mick, Carlos Lyra

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