part-5-adult-basic-life-support-and-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-quality - Part 5 Adult Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

Part-5-adult-basic-life-support-and-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-quality

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Part 5: Adult Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality Web-based Integrated 2010 & 2015 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care 1 Highlights 1.1 2017 Highlights These highlights summarize the key issues and changes in the adult and pediatric basic life support (BLS) 2017 focused updates to the American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC). Summary of Key Issues and Major Changes The topics reviewed here include the following: Dispatch-assisted CPR Use of continuous vs interrupted chest compressions by emergency medical services (EMS) providers Use of chest compression–only (Hands-Only) CPR vs CPR using chest compressions with ventilation in both the in-hospital and out-of-hospital settings At the request of the AHA Training Network, we have clarified the descriptions of lay rescuers as follows: 1. Untrained 2. Trained in chest compression–only CPR 3. Trained in CPR using chest compressions and ventilation (rescue breaths) Dispatch-Assisted CPR 2017 (Updated): We recommend that when dispatchers’ instructions are needed, dispatchers should provide chest compression–only CPR instructions to callers for adults with suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). 2015 (Old): Dispatchers should provide chest compression–only CPR instructions to callers for adults with suspected OHCA. Why: The 2017 BLS International Consensus on CPR and ECC Science With Treatment Recommendations (CoSTR) summary and systematic review considered instructions for dispatch-assisted chest compression–only CPR for OHCA. No new studies were reviewed for this topic. Bystander CPR 2017 (Updated): 1. For adults in OHCA, untrained lay rescuers should provide chest compression–only CPR with or without dispatcher assistance. 2. For lay rescuers trained in chest compression–only CPR, we recommend that they provide chest compression–only CPR for adults in OHCA. 3. For lay rescuers trained in CPR using chest compressions and ventilation (rescue breaths), it is reasonable to provide ventilation (rescue breaths) in addition to chest compressions for the adult in OHCA. Key Words: cardiac arrest cardiopulmonary resuscitation defibrillation emergency Part 5: Adult Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality 1
2015 (Old): 1. For lay rescuers, compression-only CPR is a reasonable alternative to conventional CPR in the adult cardiac arrest patient. 2. For trained lay rescuers, it is reasonable to provide ventilation in addition to chest compressions for the adult in cardiac arrest. 3. For trained lay rescuers, it is reasonable to provide ventilation in addition to chest compressions for the adult in cardiac arrest.

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