Phil 101 Notes

Phil 101 Notes - Phil 101 Notes-Test Two Descartes Third...

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Phil 101 Notes—Test Two Descartes’ Third Meditation Purpose is to prove God’s existence in a way in which God would support the rest of the world So far, all he knows is that he thinks He Thinks—He Doubts—He Wills—He Desires—He Imagines Volition : the capability of conscious choice and decision and intention Impression Judgment God grounds the possibility of everything. Saint Anselm -outstanding Christian philosopher and theologian of the eleventh century. He is best known for the celebrated “ontological argument” for the existence of God… Summarized as- that than which nothing greater can be thought can be thought; if that than which nothing greater can be though can be though, it exists in reality; that than which nothing greater can be thought exists in reality. 1) Says ideas need to come from things that share nature 2) There must be something perfect in me that has created these perceptions; every idea must have a cause that is the cause of its nature (If you have an idea of red, it must be created by something that is red) 3) There must be something perfect that exists that had produced that idea in me
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Problems- You’re assuming that God is the only perfect thing we know; do we really have equal ideas of perfection? Parallel Argument —Island of Gold? Just because I dream of it, there must be one? Three classes of ideas o Innate o Adventitious (acquired) o Invented (by me) Perfection is prior to imperfection Innate: o Formal Reality- that an idea exists I can not doubt that I have a belief in a perfect being. Whatever created that idea must share in the objective reality of my idea. o Objective Reality- that which the idea is of exists So far, he exists and God exists. Group 6 - If his parents or some other imperfect being created him, this creator must have endowed him with the idea of God. If this creator is a finite being, we have to question how it came to possess the idea of an infinite God. -We can trace this chain back through countless creators, but we must ultimately conclude that the idea of God can originate only in God, and not in some finite being. Argument - 1) I have an idea of perfection.
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2) I’m not perfect. 3) Ideas have objective reality of their causes. (In order for me to have an idea of something, that something must have produced it.) 4) An idea can not have more reality than that which caused it. (I am not perfect and I have an idea of perfection, so that idea must have come from somewhere outside of me… Something perfect.) Thus, I’m not the cause of my idea of perfection. 5) A perfect being (i.e. a being with the property of being perfect exists) -- Call him God Objections - 1) Could my idea of infinite be the negation of my own finitude? a. Gets things backwards…
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course PHIL 101 taught by Professor Neta during the Spring '07 term at UNC.

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Phil 101 Notes - Phil 101 Notes-Test Two Descartes Third...

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