Assignment 4.docx - Taking a Stand Mandy Cabrera Walden...

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Taking a Stand Mandy Cabrera Walden University
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Taking a Stand Healthcare is full of ethical, moral and legal dilemmas. Everyone has their own set of compasses that guide their decision making when these dilemmas are faced. Nurses and healthcare professionals may have a different outlook than those of a nurse manager or upper management, in which their moral and ethical compass is guided by the facilities mission and purpose. Regardless, to make a suitable decision, one must have proper familiarity of principles and frameworks in ethics. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate different ethical frameworks in practice and put them to use in a practical setting. Conceptual Frameworks: Ethical Constructs of Ethics, Moral or Legal Standards Ethics, morals and legal standards all have their place in healthcare. Without them, healthcare would be a free for all with judgmental healthcare workers that weren’t thinking about what was best for their patients. Sometimes these standards blend with each other and we have to step back and re-think what we believe in. Constructs of Ethics According to Marquis and Huston, (2017) there are four main frameworks in ethical decision making including one teleological and three deontological types. Utilitarian, being the one teleological framework believes in the betterment for the greater good. Deontological frameworks are broader, they judge the rightness or wrongness of an action. Rights based reasoning, Duty based reasoning, and intuitionism are the three frameworks in this category. Rights based reasoning states that some people get their “just due”. Duty based reasoning claim that it is “ones’ duty” to do what is right. And intuitionist framework argues that the decision- maker takes each issue on a case by case basis. Constructs of Moral Standards Moral standards are neither teleological nor deontological. Regardless of the framework, there is a core set of moral standards in healthcare. Autonomy, Beneficence, Paternalism, Utility,
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Justice, Veracity, Fidelity and Confidentiality. Often these moral standards overlap one another, however they all stem from the general principal of respect. Autonomy allows one to be responsible for their own choices, whereas Paternalism allows one person to assume authority over another’s healthcare if they cannot do it for themselves. Beneficence promotes doing good, while Nonmaleficence promotes “do no harm”. Justice seeks fairness for all, and Utility seeks the good of many because it outweighs the needs of one. Veracity, the responsibility to tell the truth; Fidelity, needing to preserve commitments; Confidentiality, keeping privileged data private. All moral values link and overlap to build healthcare standards and responsibilities.
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  • Fall '18
  • ROSEMARY MC WILLIAMS HAGGINS
  • Ethics , legal standards

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