ENG105 Definition Flash Cards 101118.docx - Active Language Arguments Audience Bias Blog Close Reading Commentary Process of developing a strong

ENG105 Definition Flash Cards 101118.docx - Active Language...

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Active Language Process of developing a strong research agenda driven by the writers interest, the need to solve real-world problems or controversies and the needs of stakeholders with differing backgrounds. Arguments Giving a reason in order to persuade someone Audience The intended viewer or listeners of a text. Writers need to understand a text’s audience in order to compose the text in a way that meets the audience’s needs and expectations. Bias When a writer allows his or her personal opinions to cloud arguments. Blog An Online forum of commentary that sometimes uses colloquial or informal language. The subjects and length vary. Close Reading Active, careful reading of a passage or passages of a text. It includes reading that examines the fine details of a text. There are three kinds of close reading: (1) reading done before a text is read, or pre-reading, (2) reading done while a text is read, and (3) reading done after a text is read, or post reading. Commentary An opinion piece, either written, verbal, or visual, that expresses the beliefs of the author. It is standard for commentators to write about current trends. Commentator A person who focuses on the significance of trends, why the trends are happening, or the outcome of the trends. Commentators may inspire critical thinking on the part of the reader. Conclusion The last paragraph of an essay in which the writer revisits the thesis statement and all supporting points. No new information belongs in the conclusion, but sometimes a prediction or call to action for the readers is supplied by the writer. Conventions Expectations or customs that writers follow. Conventions include everything from text formatting to grammar to documenting sources to genre expectations such as paragraphing and text structure. Credibility The credibility of a source depends largely on whether an audience will accept the source as authoritative or truthful. Although different audiences may assign different degrees of credibility to the same source, sources typically achieve credibility through the expertise or political views of their authors, their perceived amount of bias, and their use of acceptable evidence. Criterion (plural: criteria) A standard upon which a judgment may be decided. Criteria assist in evaluations by giving the viewer guidelines by which to determine if the material is of value. Deliberative Rhetoric Speeches take place in a public assembly. The speaker advises the audience or warns them against an idea or practice. The audience is asked to decide whether something will be good or bad for the public. Delivery (action) Utilizing appropriate voice, tone, and gestures to communicate ideas. Dialectic The strategies of argumentation used by a speaker to resolve conflict and establish truth.
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Editing The act of reading written material that has been revised and correcting conventions related to grammar and mechanics.
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