grade_worksheet.doc - GRADE track handout TEACH Workshop...

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GRADE track handout: TEACH Workshop NYAM August 2012 Exercise Work in small groups Decide whether you prefer to use GRADEpro (software) or to do the exercise on paper Select someone to report back to the whole group Watch the time 1. Familiarize yourself with the systematic review that you have been given (if you are not yet familiar with it): read the abstracts 2. Identify the clinical question in the PICO (Population, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome) format. Work in your small group. P: ____________________________________________________________________________ I: ____________________________________________________________________________ C: ____________________________________________________________________________ O: ____________________________________________________________________________ 3. Select up to 7 important outcomes for this comparison (consider the following suggestions) Suggestions a) Generate a list of relevant outcomes (see worksheet 1 ) Discuss in the group which outcomes would be relevant (think of all relevant outcomes, not only those that are in the review, but you think might be important to someone making a decision; make sure to include both benefits and downsides, e.g., adverse effects and costs, if relevant) Find consensus within your small group about which outcomes are important enough to be included in the GRADE Evidence Profile b) From this list choose up to 7 outcomes that you think are most important to a guideline panel or others making recommendations and should be included in the evidence profile; transfer them to a blank evidence profile (see worksheet 3 ) or use GRADEpro. 4. Assess the quality of evidence for this outcome according to the GRADE approach Suggestions Fill in worksheet 2 (or use GRADEpro) to assess the quality of the evidence for each outcome Consult the table “GRADE quality assessment criteria” (or use help in GRADEpro). Fill in the Quality of the Evidence column in the Evidence Profile. 5. Move from evidence to recommendations using the evidence profile Suggestions Use worksheet 4 to help decide on strong or weak recommendations See also “Definitions for strong and weak/conditional recommendations” and “Implications of strong and weak/conditional recommendations” GRADE Introductory Workshop | ver. 2011-08 1
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Worksheet 1 : List of outcomes from the systematic review Title of the systematic review: List all outcomes below. When you have completed the listing, choose up to 7 most important outcomes to be included in the GRADE evidence table. Rate the relative importance for each outcome on a 9 point scale ranging from 1 (less important) to 9 (critically important for decision making). You can use the same rating multiple times. 1 – 3 less important and not included in the GRADE Evidence Profile 4 – 6 important but not critical for making a decision (inclusion in the Evidence Profile may depend on how many other important outcomes there are) 7 – 9 critical for making a decision and should definitely be included in the Evidence Profile Transfer the selected outcomes into the blank GRADE evidence profile (see worksheet 3 of this handout). If you are using GRADEpro, begin inserting the outcomes in GRADEpro.
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  • Spring '17
  • Rosen
  • Meta-analysis, Evidence Profile

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