Ch. 9 Vocab - Acetyl CoA - an important molecule in...

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Acetyl CoA - an important molecule in metabolism, used in many biochemical reactions. Its main use is to convey the carbon atoms within the acetyl group to the Krebs Cycle to be oxidized for energy production. Aerobic – Containing oxygen; referring to an organism, environment, or cellular process that requires oxygen. Anaerobic – Lacking oxygen; referring to an organism, environment, or cellular process that lacks oxygen and may be poisoned by it. ATP Synthase - a general term for an enzyme that can synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate by using some form of energy. This energy is often in the form of protons moving down a electrochemical gradient , such as from the lumen into the stroma of chloroplasts or from the inter-membrane space into the matrix in mitochondria . Betaoxidation - the process by which fatty acids , in the form of Acyl-CoA molecules, are broken down in mitochondria and/or in peroxisomes to generate Acetyl-CoA , the entry molecule for the Krebs Cycle . Cellular Respiration - describes the metabolic reactions and processes that take place in a cell or across the cell membrane to get biochemical energy from fuel molecules and the release of the cells' waste products. Energy can be released by the oxidation of multiple fuel molecules and is stored as "high-energy" carriers. The reactions involved in respiration are catabolic reactions in metabolism. Chemiosmosis
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Ch. 9 Vocab - Acetyl CoA - an important molecule in...

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