Final Draft_ Analytical Paper - ABIGAIL BUCHANAN.pdf - Abby Buchanan RHET 102\/01 Authors movie directors graphic designers film produces and painters

Final Draft_ Analytical Paper - ABIGAIL BUCHANAN.pdf - Abby...

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Abby Buchanan RHET 102/01 May 15, 2019 Authors, movie directors, graphic designers, film produces, and painters are some of the variety of artists who spend their lives creating masterpieces in order to portray different concepts, and messages, for society to analyze, interpret, and comprehend. Two of these concepts that creators use go hand-in-hand: struggle and escape. Struggles can be broadly defined as difficult situations that people have to witness or experience first-hand throughout their lives. Escapes are the mechanisms that people use to try and get through the rough patches or lasting problems they are faced with all through their lifetimes. The novel The House on Mango Street, written by Sandra Cisneros, and the film West Side Story, directed by Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins, both capture the concepts of struggling and escaping that people in society have to endure for the duration of time they are on earth. The poverty-stricken environments that the characters live in cause struggles including discrimination and stereotypes, crime, inequality for women, death, forced and arranged marriage, and abuse to be more present. In order to escape these struggles in the harsh neighborhoods, the characters partake into substance abuse, like doing drugs. Both the novel and film create the idea that living in poor, urban areas will bring a multiplicity of struggles upon those that are living there, and that the easiest solution for trying to escape those problems is to partake into addictive activities like smoking. Being discriminated and stereotyped is a struggle that the characters in The House on Mango Streetand West Side Storyface in substantial amounts. The race of the characters was largely connected to why they were categorized under offensive
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labels, and received the crude comments they did from other characters. Alana Lentin described this correlation in her book Racism and Ethnic Discrimination: “Race, therefore, as a discourse or signifier, triggers fears, notion of threat, or even desires” (Lentin 40). In The House on Mango Street, Esperanza, the protagonist of the novel, captures a moment she encountered with one of her neighbors whom she had a short-lived friendship with. The little girl whom Esperanza was talking with was named Cathy; she was explaining to Esperanza why they could only be friends for a short while, because Cathy and her family would be leaving the area: “In the meantime they’ll just have to move a little farther north from Mango Street, a little farther away every time people like us keep moving in...Then as if she forgot I just moved in, she says the neighborhood is getting bad” (Cisneros 13). The unintentional discrimination that Cathy threw upon Esperanza and her “people” was because of their race. Esperanza recognized that Cathy’s parents did not believe it was a safe environment for Cathy to stay in, because there were people of the Latin races moving into the area, and they classified those who are the same race as Esperanza as “bad.” It can be inferred that
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