AH23113.docx - FIRE SCIENCE FIRE SCIENCE Student name...

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FIRE SCIENCE FIRE SCIENCE Student name Course Professor University Date
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FIRE SCIENCE 2 Task 1 In electrical switch rooms/cupboard locations, photoelectric smoke detectors are highly recommended because there are readily responsive to fires which begin with an extended time of smoldering. Furthermore, they are very efficient primarily due to their operating principle. They target a light source into the sensing chambers at an inclination far from the sensor. As smoke gets into the sensors, reflection of light occurs and it is directed to the light sensor hence triggering the smoke detector alarm. Time of response is a critical parameter in any fire detector. Therefore, based on this factor, the photoelectric smoke detectors are strongly recommended. In addition, their recommendation is also due to conveniences in electrical switch rooms/cupboards locations such as accessibility. In addition, they have turned out to be economical for use in large locations with electrical switch room locations particularly when there are practical challenges in accessing such areas. Additionally, they do not flex because of temperature fluctuations or imposed loads that may lead to misalignment of the photons leading to false signals (Hall, 1996). In flammable liquid hazard areas, carbon monoxide is not advised. This is due to the fact that the carbon monoxide (CO) fire detectors go into an alarm if they sense a given amount of carbon monoxide in the air over an extended period (Ingason, 2016). This means that if they are used in such locations, they will most likely give false alarms. In addition, in some environmental conditions, such as flammable liquid hazard areas, they may become immune. Furthermore, the response rate to fire in such areas is relatively slow. Additionally, they do not need to be ceiling fixed but rather they should be fixed at relatively low levels in order to be able to detect fires hence the reason they are not advised in flammable liquid hazard areas. Task 2
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FIRE SCIENCE 3 In order to determine the lower flammability limit of a mixture, four gases were selected. The selected gases are acetaldehyde, acetylene, acetic acid and 1, 3- Butadiene. The composition of the gas mixture was taken as 25% acetaldehyde, 20% acetylene, 20% acetic acid and 35% 1,3- butadiene, the mixture is flammable yet not potentially explosive. Taking the lower flammability limit of the gases as: LFL for acetaldehyde as 4 LFL for acetylene as 2.5 LFL for acetic acid as 4 LFL for 1,3- Butadiene as 2 Using equation 1, the lower flammability limit of the mixture is calculated since it forms a sound approximation for the identified mixture of flammable gases (Karlsson & Quintiere, 2000).
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  • Fall '16
  • Prof Datuk Dr Shahrin
  • Active fire protection, Fire protection

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