Fielding.The History of Tom Jones.pdf - The History of Tom...

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Unformatted text preview: The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling Henry Fielding The Harvard Classics Shelf of Fiction, Vols. I & II. Selected by Charles William Eliot Copyright © 2001 Bartleby.com, Inc. Bibliographic Record Contents General Introduction to the Harvard Classics Shelf of Fiction, by Charles W. Eliot, LL.D. The Novel in England Biographical Note Criticisms and Interpretations I. By William Makepeace Thackeray II. By Leslie Stephen III. By Austin Dobson IV. By Gordon Hall Gerould List of Characters Dedication Book I—Containing as Much of the Birth of the Foundling as Is Necessary or Proper to Acquaint the Reader with in the Beginning of This History I. Introduction to the Work, or Bill of Fare to the Feast II. A Short Description of Squire Allworthy III. An Odd Accident Which Befel Mr. Allworthy at His Return Home IV. The Reader’s Neck Brought Into Danger by a Description V. Containing a Few Common Matters, with a Very Uncommon Observation Upon Them VI. Mrs. Deborah is Introduced Into the Parish VII. Containing Such Grave Matter, That the Reader Cannot Laugh Once Through the Whole Chapter VIII. A Dialogue Between Mesdames Bridget and Deborah IX. Containing Matters Which Will Surprize the Reader X. The Hospitality of Allworthy XI. Containing Many Rules, and Some Examples, Concerning Falling in Love XII. What the Reader May, Perhaps, Expect to Find in It XIII. Which Concludes the First Book Book II—Containing Scenes of Matrimonial Felicity in Different Degrees of Life I. Showing What Kind of a History This Is II. Religious Cautions Against Showing Too Much Favour to Bastards III. The Description of a Domestic Government IV. Containing One of the Most Bloody Battles, or Rather Duels, That Were Ever Recorded in Domestic History V. Containing Much Matter to Exercise the Judgment and Reflection of the Reader VI. The Trial of Partridge, the Schoolmaster VII. A Short Sketch of That Felicity Which Prudent Couples May Extract from Hatred VIII. A Receipt to Regain the Lost Affections of a Wife IX. A Proof of the Infallibility of the Foregoing Receipt Book III—Containing the Most Memorable Transactions Which Passed in the Family of Mr. Allworthy, from the Time When Tommy Jones Arrived at the Age of Fourteen, Till He Attained the Age of Nineteen. In This Book the Reader May Pick up Some Hints Concerning the Education of Children I. Containing Little or Nothing II. The Heroe of This Great History Appears with Very Bad Omens III. The Character of Mr. Square the Philosopher, and of Mr. Thwackum the Divine IV. Containing a Necessary Apology for the Author V. The Opinions of the Divine and the Philosopher Concerning the Two Boys VI. Containing a Better Reason Still for the Beforementioned Opinions VII. In Which the Author Himself Makes His Appearance on the Stage VIII. A Childish Incident, in Which, However, Is Seen a Good-Natured Disposition in Tom Jones IX. Containing an Incident of a More Heinous Kind X. Master Blifil and Jones Appear in Different Lights Book IV—Containing the Time of a Year I. Containing Five Pages of Paper II. A Short Hint of What We Can Do in the Sublime, and a Description of Miss Sophia Western III. Wherein the History Goes Back to Commemorate a Trifling Incident That Happened Some Years Since IV. Containing Such Very Deep and Grave Matters, That Some Readers, Perhaps, May Not Relish It V. Containing Matter Accommodated to Every Taste VI. An Apology for the Insensibility of Mr. Jones VII. Being the Shortest Chapter in This Book VIII. A Battle Sung by the Muse in the Homerican Style IX. Containing Matter of No Very Peaceable Colour X. A Story Told by Mr. Supple, the Curate XI. The Narrow Escape of Molly Seagrim XII. Containing Much Clearer Matters XIII. A Dreadful Accident Which Befel Sophia XIV. The Arrival of a Surgeon Book V—Containing a Portion of Time Somewhat Longer Than Half a Year I. Of the Serious in Writing, and for What Purpose It Is Introduced II. In Which Mr. Jones Receives Many Friendly Visits III. Which All Who Have No Heart Will Think to Contain Much Ado about Nothing IV. A Little Chapter, in Which is Contained a Little Incident V. A Very Long Chapter, Containing a Very Great Incident VI. By Comparing Which with the Former, the Reader May Possibly Correct Some Abuse Which He Hath Formerly Been Guilty of in the Application of the Word Love VII. In Which Mr. Allworthy Appears on a Sick-Bed VIII. Containing Matter Rather Natural Than Pleasing IX. Which, Among Other Things, May Serve as a Comment on That Saying of æschines, That “Drunkenness Shows the Mind of a Man, as a Mirrour Reflects His Person” X. Showing the Truth of Many Observations of Ovid, and of Other More Grave Writers XI. In Which a Simile in Mr. Pope’s Period of a Mile Introduces as Bloody a Battle as Can Possibly Be Fought Without the Assistance of Steel or Cold Iron XII. In Which Is Seen a More Moving Spectacle Than All the Blood in the Bodies of Thwackum and Blifil, and of Twenty Other Such, Is Capable of Producing Book VI—Containing about Three Weeks I. Of Love II. The Character of Mrs. Western III. Containing Two Defiances to the Critics IV. Containing Sundry Curious Matters V. In Which is Related What Passed Between Sophia and Her Aunt VI. Containing a Dialogue Between Sophia and Mrs. Honour VII. A Picture of Formal Courtship in Miniature VIII. The Meeting Between Jones and Sophia IX. Being of a Much More Tempestuous Kind Than the Former X. In Which Mr. Western Visits Mr. Allworthy XI. A Short Chapter; but Which Contains Sufficient Matter to Affect the Good-Natured Reader XII. Containing Love-Letters, &c. XIII. The Behaviour of Sophia on the Present Occasion XIV. A Short Chapter, Containing a Short Dialogue Between Squire Western and His Sister Book VII—Containing Three Days I. A Comparison Between the World and the Stage II. Containing a Conversation Which Mr. Jones Had with Himself III. Containing Several Dialogues IV. A Picture of a Country Gentlewoman Taken from the Life V. The Generous Behaviour of Sophia Towards Her Aunt VI. Containing Great Variety of Matter VII. A Strange Resolution of Sophia VIII. Containing Scenes of Altercation, of No Very Uncommon Kind IX. The Wise Demeanour of Mr. Western in the Character of a Magistrate X. Containing Several Matters, Natural Enough Perhaps, but Low XI. The Adventure of a Company of Soldiers XII. The Adventure of a Company of Officers XIII. Containing the Great Address of the Landlady XIV. A Most Dreadful Chapter Indeed XV. The Conclusion of the Foregoing Adventure Book VIII—Containing about Two Days I. A Wonderful Long Chapter Concerning the Marvellous II. In Which the Landlady Pays a Visit to Mr. Jones III. In Which the Surgeon Makes His Second Appearance IV. In Which Is Introduced One of the Pleasantest Barbers That Was Ever Recorded in History V. A Dialogue Between Mr. Jones and the Barber VI. In Which More of the Talents of Mr. Benjamin Will Appear VII. Containing Better Reasons Than Any Which Have Yet Appeared for the Conduct of Partridge VIII. Jones Arrives at Gloucester, and Goes to the Bell IX. Containing Several Dialogues Between Jones and Partridge X. In Which Our Travellers Meet with a Very Extraordinary Adventure XI. In Which the Man of the Hill Begins to Relate His History XII. In Which the Man of the Hill Continues His History XIII. In Which the Foregoing Story is Farther Continued XIV. In Which the Man of the Hill Concludes His History XV. A Brief History of Europe; and a Curious Discourse Between Mr. Jones and the Man of the Hill Book IX—Containing Twelve Hours I. Of Those Who Lawfully May, and of Those Who May Not, Write Such Histories As This II. Containing a Very Surprizing Adventure Indeed, Which Mr. Jones Met with in His Walk with the Man of the Hill III. The Arrival of Mr. Jones with His Lady at the Inn IV. In Which the Arrival of a Man of War Puts a Final End to Hostilities V. An Apology for All Heroes Who Have Good Stomachs VI. A Friendly Conversation in the Kitchen VII. Containing a Fuller Account of Mrs. Waters Book X—In Which the History Goes Forward about Twelve Hours I. Containing Instructions Very Necessary to Be Perused by Modern Critics II. Containing the Arrival of an Irish Gentleman III. A Dialogue Between the Landlady and Susan the Chambermaid IV. Containing Infallible Nostrums for Procuring Universal Disesteem and Hatred V. Showing Who the Amiable Lady, and Her Unamiable Maid, Were VI. Containing, Among Other Things, the Ingenuity of Partridge, the Madness of Jones, and the Folly of Fitzpatrick VII. In Which are Concluded the Adventures That Happened at the Inn at Upton VIII. In Which the History Goes Backward IX. The Escape of Sophia Book XI—Containing about Three Days I. A Crust for the Critics II. The Adventures Which Sophia Met with After Her Leaving Upton III. A Very Short Chapter, in Which However is a Sun, a Moon, a Star, and an Angel IV. The History of Mrs. Fitzpatrick V. In Which the History of Mrs. Fitzpatrick Is Continued VI. In Which the Mistake of the Landlord Throws Sophia Into a Dreadful Consternation VII. In Which Mrs. Fitzpatrick Concludes Her History VIII. A Dreadful Alarm in the Inn, with the Arrival of an Unexpected Friend of Mrs. Fitzpatrick IX. The Morning Introduced in Some Pretty Writing X. Containing a Hint or Two Concerning Virtue, and a Few More Concerning Suspicion Book XII—Containing the Same Individual Time with the Former I. Showing What Is to Be Deemed Plagiarism in a Modern Author, and What Is to Be Considered as Lawful Prize II. In Which, Though the Squire Doth Not Find His Daughter, Something is Found Which Puts an End to His Pursuit III. The Departure of Jones from Upton IV. The Adventure of a Beggar-Man V. Containing More Adventures Which Mr. Jones and His Companion Met on the Road VI. From Which It May Be Inferred That the Best Things are Liable to Be Misunderstood and Misinterpreted VII. Containing a Remark or Two of Our Own, and Many More of the Good Company Assembled in the Kitchen VIII. Fortune Seems to Have Been in a Better Humour with Jones Than We Have Hitherto Seen Her IX. Containing Little More Than a Few Odd Observations X. Mr. Jones and Mr. Dowling Drink a Bottle Together XI. The Disasters Which Befel Jones on His Departure for Coventry XII. Relates That Mr. Jones Continued His Journey, Contrary to the Advice of Partridge XIII. A Dialogue Between Jones and Partridge XIV. What Happened to Mr. Jones in His Journey from St. Albans Book XIII—Containing the Space of Twelve Days I. An Invocation II. What Befel Mr. Jones on His Arrival in London III. A Project of Mrs. Fitzpatrick, and Her Visit to Lady Bellaston IV. Which Consists of Visiting V. An Adventure Which Happened to Mr. Jones at His Lodgings VI. What Arrived While the Company Were at Breakfast VII. Containing the Whole Humours of a Masquerade VIII. Containing a Scene of Distress, Which Will Appear Very Extraordinary to Most of Our Readers IX. Which Treats of Matters of a Very Different Kind from Those in the Preceding Chapter X. A Chapter Which, Though Short, May Draw Tears from Some Eyes XI. In Which the Reader Will Be Surprized XII. In Which the Thirteenth Book Is Concluded Book XIV—Containing Two Days I. An Essay to Prove That an Author Will Write the Better for Having Some Knowledge of the Subject II. Containing Letters and Other Matters Which Attend Amours III. Containing Various Matters IV. Which We Hope Will Be Very Attentively Perused by Young People of Both Sexes V. A Short Account of the History of Mrs. Miller VI. Containing a Scene Which We Doubt Not Will Affect All Our Readers VII. The Interview Between Mr. Jones and Mr. Nightingale VIII. What Passed Between Jones and Old Mr. Nightingale IX. Containing Strange Matters X. A Short Chapter, Which Concludes the Book Book XV—In Which the History Advances about Two Days I. Too Short to Need a Preface II. In Which Is Opened a Very Black Design Against Sophia III. A Further Explanation of the Foregoing Design IV. By Which It Will Appear How Dangerous an Advocate a Lady Is When She Applies Her Eloquence to an Ill Purpose V. Containing Some Matters Which May Affect, and Others Which May Surprize, the Reader VI. By What Means the Squire Came to Discover His Daughter VII. In Which Various Misfortunes Befel Poor Jones VIII. Short and Sweet IX. Containing Love-Letters of Several Sorts X. Consisting Partly of Facts, and Partly of Observations Upon Them XI. Containing Curious, but Not Unprecedented Matter XII. A Discovery Made by Partridge Book XVI—Containing the Space of Five Days I. Of Prologues II. A Whimsical Adventure Which Befel the Squire III. What Happened to Sophia During Her Confinement IV. In Which Sophia Is Delivered from Her Confinement V. In Which Jones Receives a Letter from Sophia, and Goes to a Play with Mrs. Miller and Partridge VI. In Which the History is Obliged to Look Back VII. In Which Mr. Western Pays a Visit to His Sister VIII. Schemes of Lady Bellaston for the Ruin of Jones IX. In Which Jones Pays a Visit to Mrs. Fitzpatrick X. The Consequence of the Preceding Visit Book XVII—Containing Three Days I. Containing a Portion of Introductory Writing II. The Generous and Grateful Behaviour of Mrs. Miller III. The Arrival of Mr. Western, with Some Matters Concerning the Paternal Authority IV. An Extraordinary Scene Between Sophia and Her Aunt V. Mrs. Miller and Mr. Nightingale Visit Jones in the Prison VI. In Which Mrs. Miller Pays a Visit to Sophia VII. A Pathetic Scene Between Mr. Allworthy and Mrs. Miller VIII. Containing Various Matters IX. What Happened to Mr. Jones in the Prison Book XVIII—Containing about Six Days I. A Farewell to the Reader II. Containing a Very Tragical Incident III. Allworthy Visits Old Nightingale; with a Strange Discovery That He Made on That Occasion IV. Containing Two Letters in Very Different Stiles V. In Which the History Is Continued VI. In Which the History Is Farther Continued VII. Continuation of the History VIII. Further Continuation IX. A Further Continuation X. Wherein the History Begins to Draw Towards a Conclusion XI. The History Draws Nearer to a Conclusion XII. Approaching Still Nearer to the End Chapter the Last In Which the History Is Concluded General Introduction to the Harvard Classics Shelf of Fiction, by Charles W. Eliot, LL.D. THE SELECTION of twenty volumes of famous fiction as a supplement to The Harvard Classics, and also for separate sale, has proved to be a very interesting undertaking. The first question was what national literatures ought to be represented; the second, what authors in each nation. Both these questions had great interest. The actual contents of The Harvard Classics affected them both. In the original selection of The Harvard Classics, fiction was admitted only to a small extent, and none was admitted that was later than 1835. Indeed, Manzoni’s “I Promessi Sposi,” a historical novel published in 1826, was the only book included that would now be called a novel. “Don Quixote” (Part I) and “Pilgrim’s Progress,” two other pieces of prose fiction which found place in the collection, both belonging to the seventeenth century, have a character quite distinct from that of the nineteenth-century novel, romance, or story. Selected stories from the “Thousand and One Nights” constituted one volume of The Harvard Classics, representing there ancient Oriental fiction made known to Europe two centuries ago, and since engrafted on European literature; but these stories differ widely from the fiction of the nineteenth century in style, matter, and motive. Another kind of fiction, the fable and wonder story, was illustrated in The Harvard Classics by one volume containing fables which pass under the name of Æsop, the tales collected by the brothers Grimm, and the fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen; but again this form of fiction is distinct from that which the new set of twenty volumes is in tended to illustrate. Yet, after all, there are five volumes of fiction in The Harvard Classics; and that fact necessarily affected the present choice. This collection contains modern novels, romances, and short stories, the oldest of which appeared in 1749, but most belong to the nineteenth century. The twenty volumes represent seven different national literatures, namely: English, American, French, Spanish, German, Russian, and Scandinavian. More than half the set, eleven volumes, is devoted to English and American fiction, French having two volumes, German two, Russian four, and Spanish and Scandinavian sharing one volume. The great inventors in novel-writing wrote in English; but the short story has been developed by the English, the Americans, the French, the Germans, and the Scandinavians. The Russian novel is a type by itself. It has had an extraordinary influence in Russia, and has done much to make Russia known to the rest of the reading world. The influence of the novel on social and industrial reform has been strong in all the countries in which it has been well developed; and the historical romance and the novel have been, since the opening of the nineteenth century, a new force in the world. The selection of individual authors came next; and then the choice, if possible, of the most appropriate and desirable work of each author. Here certain limitations which took effect on The Harvard Classics had again to be accepted. Many admirable novels or romances were too long to be included in this set. Living authors were excluded. No books are included of which it cannot fairly be said that they were famous in their generation, and have since shown a strong power of survival. Each author is represented by a work generally counted among his best; so that any one who reads the whole set may feel that he has made the acquaintance of thirty writers of modern fiction under favorable conditions. He will have seen each of them in some characteristic and durable production. On the choice of authors, and the choice of the best available work of each author, it soon appeared that no general consent among competent judges was likely to be attained and that the ultimate decision would necessarily be more or less arbitrary, and liable to provoke dissent. The selection of the best authors and of the best book of each author depends on taste, literary discrimination, and moral judgments, combined with individual affections or devotions which are often warm. Discussion of these choices with numerous good judges developed a great variety of opinions on both these kinds of selection or preference. But, although there was no general consent that the selected authors were all the best of their nation, or that the selected book representing each author was his best, there was general consent that the authors were all creditable representatives of the fiction of their respective nations, and that the work selected for each was a good representative of the author’s genius. The differences of opinion related to comparative values, not to the positive merit of the authors and works chosen. The value of the set is enhanced by the biographical and critical introduction, written by Professor Neilson, and by the six essays on the several national contributions to the collection. There is no work in the series which does not illustrate good literary form, and none which may not be read over and over again with pleasure and profit. It provides the intellectually ambitious family with a body of interesting and enjoyable literature, good not only for the present generation but for their children and grandchildren. It portrays the emotions, the passion and some of the moral efforts of the nineteenth century and the last half of the eighteenth century, and pictures vividly the changing manners and social states during that tremendous period; but in so doing it portrays intense human feelings and motives which will be only slowly modified and purified in time to come. It is, therefore, a durable collection. The Novel in England THE HISTORICAL origins and development of the E...
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