fact-sheet-koala.pdf - The Koala Fact Sheet makes up plant cell walls To obtain enough food an adult koala must eat more than half a kilogram of leaves

fact-sheet-koala.pdf - The Koala Fact Sheet makes up plant...

This preview shows page 1 out of 1 page.

© The State of Queensland, (Queensland Museum) 2011 Introduction The koala ( Phascolarctos cinereus ) is one of the most familiar native Australian mammals. It is easily recognised by its soft grey and white fur, large hairy ears and black bulbous nose. Although often called a ‘koala bear’ or ‘teddy bear’, it is a marsupial and is not related to the true placental bears. The name ‘koala’ is an Aboriginal word meaning ‘no drink’, a broadly appropriate description considering koalas usually obtain sufficient moisture from their diet of leaves, but the same is also true of most of the possums. The koala is the only living representative of the family Phascolarctidae. Its closest relatives are the wombats. Fossil remains of koala-like creatures that are about 15 million years old are known and it a likely that koalas and wombats shared a common ancestor about 25 million years ago. Certainly, they share many similar characteristics: both have vestigial tails; cheek pouches; backward-opening pouches for carrying their young; few premolar teeth; and unique blood proteins.
Image of page 1

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture