Chapter 5 notes

Chapter 5 notes - Descriptive Research Chapter 5...

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Descriptive Research Chapter 5
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Descriptive Research The goal of descriptive research is to describe the characteristics or behaviors of a given population in a systematic and accurate fashion Typically not designed to test hypotheses but is conducted to provide information about some group of people
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Types of Descriptive Research 1. Surveys 1. Demographic Research 1. Epidemiological Research
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Surveys Most common type of descriptive research Used to asses people’s attitudes, lifestyles, behaviors, and problems Survey vs questionnaire Surveys can be either questionnaires or interviews Most conducted face-to-face but can also be conducted by phone, through the mail, or via the Web Questionnaires are paper/pencil response
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Types of Surveys 1. Cross-sectional 2. Successive independent samples 3. Longitudinal (panel design) 4. Internet
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1. Cross-sectional survey design When a single group of respondents is surveyed “one shot studies” can provide important information about characteristics of the group, or how groups differ in their attitudes or behaviors if more than one group is surveyed
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2. Successive independent samples survey design used to assess changes in attitudes or behaviors in a group over time two or more samples of respondents answer the same questions at different points in time even though the samples consist of different individuals. Assumes that conclusions can be drawn about the group that both samples belong to as long as they are selected in the same way each time
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Gallup Poll Example
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3. Longitudinal survey design When a single group of respondents is questioned more than once The same sample surveyed on more than one occasion to study changes in their behavior. Includes the problem that respondents cannot
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Chapter 5 notes - Descriptive Research Chapter 5...

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