bio lab fastplants.doc - Junior Roberts Konark Patel...

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Junior Roberts, Konark Patel Professor Winicov Bio 202L Date Submitted: May-13-2015 Mendelian Fast Plants. Abstract : In order to thoroughly study genetic heredity Wisconsin fast plants were grown by all of the Biology 202L sections. The reason why these fast plants are chosen is because their life cycles are short therefore making them easier to be observed. The first P generation of the fast plants is homozygous for two traits, stem color, and leaf color; one being homozygous recessive, and one homozygous dominant. These plants were grown and cross pollinated to produce the F1 generation. As the plants grew they were pollinated and developed seed pods. The seeds from the pods were planted and grown to be the F2 generation. The phenotypes from the grown F2 plants were observed and statistically analyzed to find out how close the ratio of the seedlings are to the Mendelian dihybrid cross prediction. The purpose of the experiment was to prove Gregor Mendel’s law of independent assortment. Introduction : This experiment was somewhat of a replication of Gregor Mendel’s experiment with pea plants. When plants reproduce, the offspring inherited the genes of both parents. Although the gene passed down two traits, one from each parent, the phenotypes will be
seen due to the dominant gene in a genotype. The traits looked at were the leaf color and the stem color. The genotypic traits are YGR which represents the dominant green leaf, ygr which represents the recessive yellow-green leaf, ANL which represents the dominant purple stem, and anl which represents the recessive green stem (nonpurple-stem). When the plants of a homozygous recessive and a homozygous dominant cross, all of the offspring should have a dominant phenotype and carry a heterozygous genotype. Therefore in respect to the phenotypes being observed, all of the plants should look like the homozygous dominant parent. The seeds that were grown were of the F1 generation. If they were planted, grown, and crossed pollinated with each other, some of the offspring plant showed the recessive phenotype. Mendel used a punnett square, which is a handy diagrammatic device for predicting the allele composition of offspring from a cross between individuals of known genetic makeup, to show the possible types of

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