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Study Guide for Exam #3

Study Guide for Exam #3 - Study Guide for Psych Exam#3...

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Study Guide for Psych Exam #3 03/04/2007 22:36:00 Learning (Modules 20-22) What is classical conditioning? Also known as  Pavlovian Conditioning, A type of learning in which an organism comes to associate stimuli.  A neutral  stimulus that signals an unconditioned stimulus (UCS) begins to produce a  response that anticipates and prepares for the unconditioned stimulus. What is the UCS? UCR? CS? CR?  (Be able to identify each in examples of  classical conditioning) UCS (Unconditioned stimulus): A stimulus that unconditionally-naturally and  automatically-triggers a response UCR (Unconditioned Response): The unlearned, naturally occurring response  to the unconditioned stimulus, such as salivation when food is in the mouth. CS (Conditioned stimulus): An originally irrelevant stimulus that, after  association with an unconditioned stimulus, comes to trigger a conditioned  response CR (Conditioned Response): The learned response to a previously neutral  conditioned stimulus Example: An experimenter sounds a tone just before delivering an air puff to  your eye.  After several repetitions, you blink to the tone alone. o UCS: The puff of air following the sound of a tone o UCR: Blinking your eyes after the puff of air o CS: The tone (with no puff of air) o CR: Your eye blinking after hearing the tone naturally, with no puff of  air following What is acquisition?  Extinction? Spontaneous recovery? Generalization?  Discrimination?
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Acquisition:  The initial stage in classical conditioning; the phase associating  a neutral stimulus with an unconditioned stimulus so that the neutral stimulus  comes to elicit a conditioned response Extinction:  The diminishing of a conditioned response; occurs in classical  conditioning when an unconditioned stimulus (UCS) does NOT follow a  conditioned stimulus (CS) Spontaneous Recovery:  The discovery by Pavlov, that several hours of  elapsed time before sounding the tone again, the salivation to the tone would  appear spontaneously. Generalization:  The tendency, once a response has been conditioned, for  stimuli similar to the conditioned stimulus to elicit similar responses  (I.E. The  dog conditioned to the sound of one tone also responded somewhat to the  sound of a different tone never paired with the food; Or when a dog is  conditioned to salivate when rubbed would also salivate somewhat when  scratched or when stimulated on a different body part) Discrimination:  The learned ability to distinguish between a conditioned  stimulus and other stimuli that do not signal an unconditioned stimulus.  (I.E. 
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