English Research Paper.docx - Title Alison Parmer English 1...

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Title Alison Parmer English 1 Section 2138 14 December 2018
Parmer 1 Elizabeth Cady Stanton, an iconic women’s leader, experienced the frustrations of confinement as a woman in the 19 th century that galvanized a major movement. She grew up in a well-to-do family where her mother stressed the importance of fulfilling matronly duties and she struggled emotionally with her parents’ deep desire to have a son that would carry on their family lineage. Male rivalry along with learning law from her father inspired Elizabeth to strive for change, but before her career began, she fell in love and married an abolitionist. Elizabeth and her husband honeymooned at an anti-slavery convention in London where she met Lucretia Mott, both banned from entering due to their gender, and agreed to work together towards changing the circumstances for women. Elizabeth and her husband had several children together and she stayed home to perform her wifely duties as her husband traveled for work. The lonely restrictive lifestyle wore down her patience for the unjust society that women were expected to participate in and, at the same time, she reconnected with Mott, which sparked the start of a fierce movement, women’s suffrage. In “Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony: Correspondence, Writings, Speeches”, Author Ellen Carol DuBois describes Stanton and Anthony’s impact; “In defiance of the prescription that women’s concerns should be limited to family and religion, their passions were unabashedly political… By their leadership of the organized women’s movement, and their contribution to the eventual enfranchisement of women, they brought their entire sex a little further out of the kitchen, a little closer to the center of social power” (xiii). DuBois implies Stanton and her allies were a monumental force in earning rights for women and women are better off from her efforts. Stanton’s upbringing shaped her views on women’s societal roles and her controversial ideas developed women’s suffrage into a movement that
Parmer 2 advanced an entire gender starting from the first convention in Seneca Falls, to lecturing on a circuit, and ending with writing The Woman’s Bible . Elizabeth Cady was born into a wealthy family. Her mother, Margaret, was an elite in the New York social class coming from the Livingston family and her father, Daniel, was a self- made man who became a successful lawyer. Her mother rigidly taught Elizabeth and her four sisters’ domestic duties to prepare them for marriage as they were not allowed careers. Her parents were deeply affected by their inability to have a son because it was the primary source for carrying on their family lineage (Banner 1-4). Lois Banner, author of, “Elizabeth Cady Stanton: A Radical for Woman’s Rights”, recognizes Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s feministic spirit at age five; “In musing on the genesis of her feminism, Cady Stanton later asserted that her first

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