Punishment on Trial Paper.docx - Elizabeth Tripp Six...

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Elizabeth Tripp6/1/19Six Principles of PunishmentIn the third section of the article Punishment on Trial(Capani 2004), six principles for how delivering effective punishment. The article not only gives a description of each principle, but examples and reasons for the need. In this paper, I will be summarizing the principles, givingthoughts on the examples provided in the paper and attempt to use the information gained from the article to give personal examples I have experienced.The first principle discussed talks about how there needs to be a behavioral contingency. This sounds simple, but often is misinterpreted. A behavioral contingency is a relationship between a specific behavior and the consequence and how that relationship is consistent. The article pointed out a common way of thinking of this is an “If__, then __” (Capani, 101) statement. For example, if I finish this paper, then I can relax the rest of the weekend. For a punishment to have and effect there does need to be a reliably relationship between the behavior and the consequence. If there is not, the punishment won’t be successful. It can be seen very clearly in the example given in the article with the aliens from Freudania and the stolen Earth child. By not having the behavioral contingency, if you eat your vegetables then you get dessert, the child was not likely to follow the rule of eating vegetables before dessert. This can be seen in my clients at work. I work with children who have autism andoften am teaching them basic social skills, such as gaining attention. The key to teaching them this is to not give them the attention they seek unless they have appropriately gained. For example, I have a client who will make, what I call, grand entrances. He will swing open doors or make a loud noise, so everyone’s attention goes to them when they come into a room.
However, I do not look. This brings up the contingency of if he taps my shoulder or call my name, then he gets my attention. Conversely, if he does not tap my shoulder or call my name, then he does not get my attention. Another key point brought up with the first principle is how people think they are using behavioral contingencies but are more using what they called “deceptive impostor(s)” (Capini, 104). The reasoning for them not considering these impostors as true behavioral contingencies isbecause they fell more into the realm of subjectivity than objectivity. The behaviors weren’t specific and were driven more by feeling and interpretation than it was by what was occurring

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