11___Supreme_Court___Econ_101 - Econ 101 Introduction to...

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Econ 101 Introduction to Microeconomics Professor Richard V. Burkhauser How the Supreme Court Uses Economic Concepts: The Case of Maximum Hours Laws
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How to Read a Supreme Court Case Like an Economist This is an introductory economics course, not a law school course, so focus on how economic ideas are used by lawyers (very smart lawyers). In reading these cases consider the following questions : 1. What are the facts of the case? 2. What is the key issue or issues on which the case turns? That is, of the many issues raised, which issue is critical to the decision? 3. What is the central argument used to justify the majority opinion? 4. What is the central argument used to justify the minority opinion? 5. What are the economic consequence of the decision? Behavioral Income distributional Efficiency versus equity Short-run versus long-run 6. What makes the “appropriate” decision? Why? Why not?
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Question 1. Muller v. Oregon (1908) by a 9-0 vote allowed
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2008 for the course ECON 1110 taught by Professor Wissink during the Fall '06 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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11___Supreme_Court___Econ_101 - Econ 101 Introduction to...

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