9206_readings.docx - CHCCN305A Provide care for babies Develop and maintain a nurturing relationship with babies\/infants Contents Undertake both planned

9206_readings.docx - CHCCN305A Provide care for babies...

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CHCCN305A: Provide care for babies Develop and maintain a nurturing relationship with babies/infants
Contents Undertake both planned and spontaneous interactions with babies/infants 3 Use routines of physical care as opportunities to positively interact with babies/infants 3 Emotional needs and physical care routines 3 Meeting emotional needs during physical care routines 3 Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) 3 Take time to get to know the baby/infant, their individual routines, rhythms, preferences and cues 3 Temperament and individual responses 3 Information about temperament types can be useful to caregivers of infants 3 Communication with infants and toddlers 3 Cues of babies and toddlers 3 Interpreting and responding to non-verbal cues 3 Responding to babies and toddlers 3 Fostering secure and nurturing relationships 3 Primary caregivers 3 Parents’ anxiety 3 Accommodate individual routines of daily care, rest and play for babies/infants whenever possible 3 ° Certificate III in Children’s Services: CHCCN305A: Reader LO 9206 © NSW DET 2010
Undertake both planned and spontaneous interactions with babies/infants The best time to initiate planned interactions with babies/infants is when they are in an alert but relaxed state. Caregivers need to observe each infant and document their patterns of behaviour throughout the day, taking note of their non-verbal cues. An alert state is often signalled by an open, direct gaze with relaxed body posture—perhaps accompanied by gurgling or cooing. If we are ‘tuned-in’ to the infant, we can also take advantage of their calm, receptive periods to initiate spontaneous interactions—these should involve the infants’ senses (sight, hearing, touch, taste and smell) but not be over-stimulating. We can usually tell when the infant has had enough by signals such as turning or shaking the head, or starting to cry. Certificate III in Children’s Services: CHCCN305A: Reader LO 9206 ° © NSW DET 2010
Use routines of physical care as opportunities to positively interact with babies/infants Emotional needs and physical care routines Routines are the ways that we care for the physical needs of infants and young children. They are not the daily timetable or schedule. Common routines in the care of infants occur during these times: arrival and departure nappy change meal times, including snack times dressing and undressing sleep and rest bath time. We will look more closely at organising physical routines a little later. But first we are going to consider infants’ emotional needs during these routines. Meeting emotional needs during physical care routines It’s easy to identify the physical needs of the infant—for example, we can tell when they are hungry, wet, tired or dirty. Most people working with small children can notice and deal with these needs.

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