Unit 6 Chapter 14.docx - Unit 6 Introduction We will...

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Unit 6: Introduction:We will examine proposed solutions to the problems plaguing US and pitfalls of each compBy 1850, there was no way for US to continue avoiding slavery1819, Missouri requested admission of slave sstate, uneasy comp was negotiated1849, comp was unraveling bc of newly acquired territories from MexicoShould slavery expand?Even dominant political parties could not reach consensusAlthough Wilmot Proviso never became law, it was popular among Free Soilers and Abolitionistsbc it reflected their views that slavery should not be expanded WSettlers in TX and some Congress like Clay and Calhoun felt that N was unnecessarily interfering with right of S to continue its proslavery heritageAs pres, Taylor took position which was in line with Wilmot Proviso, upon his death, Fillmore, brokered comp of 1850There were many terms from comp which did not sit well with both sidesFugitive Slave Act was very contentious as it expanded power of S slave owners to venture into free states to take escaped or freedmen as slavesIt was only a matter of time before comp came crumblingThe event which led to collapse of truce occurred in Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854The law basically repealed Missouri Comp which outlawed the expansion of slavery into N by granting the residents of Kansas and Nebraska the right to decide for themselves whether or notto prohibit slaveryThe effects galvinized neighboring states to send in people to influence the decision of Kansas.Violence ensued and the birth of Repub Party were consequential resultsSupreme Court waded in stalemate in 1857 with infamous Dred Scott vs Sandford decisionWhile politicians were struggling to deal with questions surrounding expansion, act initiated in fed court by slave Dred Scott to obtain freedom brought Supreme Court into mixCourt rejected Scott’s claim that he was free, but went beyond issue in dispute to rule that people of African race were never intended by founders and US Cons to be citizens of USCourt ruled that Congress lacked authority to limit slavery within countrySupreme Court transformed entire US into one giant slaveholding country, invalidating all previous comps like Wilmot Proviso and concept of popular sovereigntyIssue drove wedge between two campsLanguage used by scholars describing events can be contentiousExpression such as “Radical Republicans” were used to denote Repubs who were in favor of absolute equality between blacks and whites and who demanded an immediate end to slaveryThe “fire-eaters” were proslavery advocates willing to secede from Union rather than concede any lmitation on slaveryPossibility of peaceful resolution appeared elusiveOn both sides, supporters and opponents of slavery felt that comps had not worked wellJohn Brown, antislavery proponent whose attack on fed battery in Harpers Ferry, VA in 1859 was intended to provoke massive slave upsrising, ended up widening rift between N and S

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